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  • Drilling Automation and Downhole Monitoring with Physics-based Models

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 05/12/2020 at 9:30 AM (EDT)

    Presented by Dr. John Hedengren

    The drilling industry faces challenging market conditions that motivate the use of automation to reduce costs and decrease well manufacturing variability. The objective of this presentation is to motivate automation initiatives that utilize physics-based models for predictive monitoring and control. This presentation explores current progress, challenges, and opportunities to control critical drilling conditions such as downhole pressure in Managed Pressure Drilling (MPD). The 3 essential elements of automation are explored with a perspective on recent advancements in automation due to downhole measurement availability through wired drillpipe. However, only a small fraction of drilling systems currently utilize wired drillpipe. In automated rig systems, there is additional potential to unlock the predictive capabilities of physics-based models to "see" into the near future to optimize and coordinate control actions.

    A convergence of several key technologies creates an opportunity to use sophisticated mathematical models within automation. A significant challenge is the size of the physics- based models that have too many adjustable parameters or are too slow in simulation to extract actionable information. This presentation shows how fit-for-purpose models can be used directly in the automation solutions. These fit-for-purpose models have unlocked new ways to think about automation in drilling. For example, rate optimization and pressure control have traditionally been separate applications in MPD. Simulation studies suggest significant potential improvement when combining the two applications.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. John Hedengren and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. John Hedengren.

    Dr. John Hedengren

    Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical Engineering, Brigham Young University

    Dr. Hedengren received a PhD degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. Previously, he developed the APMonitor Optimization Suite and worked with ExxonMobil on Advanced Process Control. His primary research focuses on accelerating automation technology in drilling. Other research interests include fiber optic monitoring, Intelli-fields, reservoir optimization, and unmanned aerial systems.  In addition to drilling automation, he is a leader of the Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (C-UAS), applying UAV automation and optimization technology to energy infrastructure.

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  • Practical and Value-driven Management of Non-Technical Risks

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 04/02/2020 at 9:30 AM (EDT)

    Presented by Christiaan Luca

    Non-technical or external stakeholder risks have become a dominant factor in the upstream business. Especially capital projects may experience significant schedule delays or cost overruns due a variety of issues of governmental, social, environmental, security or other external nature. Delegating your response to External Affairs or hiding behind a Corporate Social Responsibility program is no longer good enough.

    Adequate addressing of non-technical risks, both mitigating downsides and benefiting from upsides, can be done, but needs an advanced level of internal organization and a culture that accepts external stakeholder perspectives. Technical functions need to take an active role and responsibility in addressing non-technical risks and need to work closely together with commercial and externally facing functions.

    Christiaan Luca will give you practical tips on how to organize internally for effective addressing of non-technical risks and how to minimize undesired surprises from external stakeholders. The important role of management and the technical functions will be a key element of this lecture. A solid external response requires a solid internal organization.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Christiaan Luca and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Christiaan Luca.

    Christiaan Luca

    Independent Trainer, Assessor and Coach

    Mr. Luca graduated with a BSc in mining engineering and a MSc in petroleum engineering, both from Delft University, the Netherlands. The first 14 years of his 32-year career with Shell he spent overseas in a variety of petroleum engineering roles, including drilling, reservoir engineering, project planning and economics developing oil and gas fields in Thailand, Syria, Gabon and Nigeria.

    Upon returning to Shells corporate offices in the Netherlands, he held various management roles in technology and business strategy and planning. In these positions he was closely involved with externally challenged programs in CCS and Rigs-to-Reefs. Until end 2016, Christiaan was the head of Shells global practice in non-technical risk management. He now is an independent trainer, assessor and coach in this expertise area.

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  • Global Climate Change Wars and Fossil Energy; Current and Future Realities

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 03/05/2020 at 9:30 AM (EST)

    Presented by Dr. George Stosur

    Global climate change remains top of the agenda for lively discussion on TV documentaries, frightening newspaper headlines, science magazines and foreign policy journals. 

    The sudden abundance of relatively clean and inexpensive shale oil and gas is profoundly changing global energy markets. Despite the rapid growth of renewable energy, the fact remains that fossil fuels will continue to dominate world energy consumption for decades to come. Therefore, fossil fuel consumption will continue to produce greenhouse gas emissions that are linked to global warming. Public and political pressure, however, is to curtail the use of oil and gas hydrocarbons or find solution for permanent disposal of heat trapping gases. This is no longer an option for the future; it is a political necessity. 

    Carbon dioxide sequestration and storage presents a huge challenge for research and development. Massive projects will eventually be required, leading to many opportunities, new businesses and specialized services. Most of these activities will fall on the shoulders of petroleum engineers and geologists.

    This presentation provides a view on global climate change issues, starting with causes and effects, the positions of believers and skeptics and the often contradictory arguments of scientists and policy makers, with the likely political consequences for the petroleum industry.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. George Stosur and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. George Stosur.

    Dr. George Stosur

    Speaker

    Dr. Stosur managed oil and gas R&D programs at the U.S. Department of Energy in Washington, D.C. for 22 years. He was responsible for DOE-sponsored research at universities, National Laboratories and joint R&D projects with several countries. Other experience includes Chevron and Shell Oil R&D in EOR, heavy oil, and the first trial of using nuclear explosive to fracture ultra-low permeability formations. He served as an SPE Section Director, SPE Distinguished Lecturer and guest speaker for several cruise lines. Authored 86 papers and contributed to a five-volume encyclopedia on hydrocarbons. He holds two M.S. degrees and a Ph.D. in petroleum engineering.

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  • Stop, Drop and Circulate, An Engineered Approach to Coiled Tubing Intervention in Horizontal Wells

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 02/06/2020 at 9:30 AM (EST)

    Presented by Charles Pope

    In North America, the average cost of a coiled tubing intervention is $250,000. Experience shows that 30% of the wells will have cost overruns of more than $500,000. Additionally, 1 well in 16 has a stuck pipe event and consequently, the costs escalates to an average of $1.7 million per well.

    This talk will share how and where coiled tubing is used around the world. Historical practices are reviewed and the issues associated with them.

    Also, the need for engineering involvement to improve the coiled tubing intervention will be . This includes a road map for expected drag, detailed time modeling, fluid system planning and data capture. Planned short trips have been eliminated.  Low viscosity fluids are used to provide superior hole cleaning. When overpull is observed, operators should stop pulling out of the hole, drop down, and circulate until the debris is removed.  

    This engineered solution has been performed on over 75 coiled tubing interventions. These procedural improvements reduced time on location by 50%, reduced cost by 50% and prevented any stuck pipe.

    One take away: old, historical practices are not your friend in preventing stuck pipe. The solution: stop, drop and circulate.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Charles Pope and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Charles Pope.

    Charles Pope

    Founder, Complete Shale

    Mr. Pope is the founder of Complete Shale, an international consulting firm specializing in drilling and completing horizontal wells. Charles has spent more than 35 years working in the oilfield. He completed the first horizontal well in the Austin Chalk in the late 1980’s. Charles serves on the SPE ATCE Well Completions Committee and SPE Workshop: Application of Integrated Diagnostics for Unconventional Resource Development Committee.  He has authored multiple technical papers. While working at Devon, he was the Completions Technology Supervisor, where he led a team focused on optimizing coiled tubing interventions. He has held various positions with Sun, XTO Energy and Pinnacle Technology. Charles formed Complete Shale 2008. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Oklahoma. Charles will serve as a SPE Distinguished Lecturer for 2018-2019.

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  • Enhanced Production Through Surface Facilities Sand Management

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 01/21/2020 at 9:30 AM (EST)

    Presented by Dr. Hank Rawlins

    All oil & gas wells produce sand – either a little or a lot! Conventional sand control, which includes production limits or completions, has two downsides:

         1.          neither method achieves maximum production

         2.          both methods fail at some point - allowing solids to overwhelm the surface facility

    Solids handling then becomes an expensive maintenance problem, HSE incident, or downtime production loss. What if the facility handled sand without interruption or equipment downtime? Even better, what if sand co-production improved recovery or restarted shut-in wells? Facilities Sand Management (FSM) skillfully handles solids to sustain production while minimizing the effects on operations.

    FSM methodology uses five discrete steps: Separation, Collection, Cleaning, Dewatering, and Transport. All steps must be followed, with a focus on the approach - not a piece of equipment. Separation removes sand and solids from the flow stream, while Collection gathers the solids into a central location and isolate them from the process. Cleaning, if required, removes associated oil and Dewatering removes associated liquids – both to simplify handling and minimize handling volume. Transport brings the solids to disposal location, which may be discharge, landfill, ship-to-shore, or injection. Each step is integral to simplify operations and extend equipment life, and all steps can be incorporated into new or existing facilities. Solids handling should not be viewed as a waste stream treatment problem – it is a critical flow assurance task. FSM provides a degree of skill to solids handling to sustain flow in surface operations and enhance production.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. Hank Rawlins and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. Hank Rawlins.

    Dr. Hank Rawlins

    Technical Director, eProcess Technologies

    Dr. Rawlins has 25 years’ experience in the upstream oil & gas industry. He actively conducts research in Facilities Sand Management, Produced Water Treatment, and Compact Separations Systems - and blogs weekly, teaches courses, and has fifty-six publications on these topics. Hank served as the chair of the SPE Separations Technology Technical Section (2013-2015), was an SME Henry Krumb Lecturer (2011-2012), and co-authored the PEH Chapter on Produced Water Treatment. Dr. Rawlins holds a PhD in Metallurgical Engineering from the University of Missouri-Rolla, is a registered Professional Engineer, and serves as adjunct professor at Montana Tech.

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  • Advances in Sensor Technology Research to Support Drilling Automation

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 12/10/2019 at 9:30 AM (EST)

    The University of Texas at Austin has been working on advanced sensor technologies over the last 6 years in a bid to improve the safety and efficiency of drilling operations, and to reduce uncertainty with regards to data and situational awareness.

    The University of Texas at Austin has been working on advanced sensor technologies over the last 6 years in a bid to improve the safety and efficiency of drilling operations, and to reduce uncertainty with regards to data and situational awareness. The sensor technologies include a cuttings transport sensor, an X-Ray densitometer, an automated rheometer and a bit box sensor. All these sensors are enabled by recent advances in hardware and software technologies. This presentation will introduces all the four technologies, their working principles, the prototypes built and results from field trials. These sensors are expected to play a big role as we move towards drilling automation.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. Pradeepkumar Ashok and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. Pradeepkumar Ashok.

    Dr. Pradeepkumar Ashok

    Senior Research Scientist, Rig Automation and Performance Improvement in Drilling (RAPID) Group, UT Austin

    Dr. Ashok is a PhD in Mechanical Engineering and a Senior Research Scientist in the Rig Automation and Performance Improvement in Drilling (RAPID) Group at UT Austin. He is also the CTO of a startup Intellicess that was spun out of UT to commercialize a technology that allows one to differentiate between sensor and process faults. Previously he was the Program Manager and Chief Scientist of the Robotics Research Group at U.T., where he managed automation projects funded by ONR, NASA, DARPA, John Deere, Union Pacific and Intuitive Surgical. He has authored many publications on sensor data fusion, decision theory, automation and controls. He directs the drilling data analytics student program at UT.

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  • Causes for Cement Plug Failures and Proactive Measures to Maximize Success

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 11/21/2019 at 9:30 AM (EST)

    It is quite well known within the Industry that cement plug placement and its success in the first attempt is challenging. There are multitude of reasons for failures, such as improper hole cleaning, lack of adequate support for the cement plug, placement techniques, inadequate volume etc. T

    It is quite well known within the Industry that cement plug placement and its success in the first attempt is challenging. There are multitude of reasons for failures, such as improper hole cleaning, lack of adequate support for the cement plug, placement techniques, inadequate volume etc. This presentation will aim at first understanding the main challenges and causes of failures and then provide guidance on best practices to minimize failures and maximize success. It will encompass Fluid selection, placement techniques and use of softwares so that a comprehensive approach can be adopted as recommendations to address these challenges to minimize the risks of failures.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Deepak Khatri and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Deepak Khatri.

    Deepak Khatri

    Product Line Director, Cementing, Baker Hughes

    Mr. Khatri has a total of twenty-two years of industry experience, spread across the Middle East, Europe, Africa and North America. He has worked primarily in oil well cementing and has specialized in the areas of Technical support, design, execution, evaluation of cementing jobs including business and training in relation to cementing. He holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Bombay University and a Masters’ in Business Administration from Oklahoma State University. To his credit, he has co-authored SPE papers and has published oil well cementing related articles for trade shows. He has delivered presentations at SPE and other Industry Leading Forums.

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  • CO2 in the Subsurface - From EOR to Storage

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 11/19/2019 at 9:30 AM (EST)

    Presented by Dr. Gary Teletzke

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the International Energy Agency (IEA) have issued recent reports suggesting that deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) can significantly reduce the cost of achieving CO2 emission reduction targets.  However, several questions remain: Under what circumstances will large-scale deployment take place? Where and when will this occur? How large a role will CCS play in stabilizing atmospheric concentrations of CO2? I will review the current status of CO2-EOR and geologic storage focusing on subsurface lessons learned and their implications for large-scale CCS.

    Our industry has a long history with CO2-EOR that provides a strong experience base for CO2 storage. However, CO2-EOR alone will be insufficient to meet emission reduction targets and storage in deep saline aquifers is also being investigated.Experience from operating CCS projects shows that subsurface storage capacity in saline formations can be limited by dynamic injectability factors. Hundreds of years of CO2 storage capacity is potentially available, even after accounting for dynamic limitations, but the areal distribution of potential storage capacity is widely varied. Geologic and reservoir engineering studies will be essential for identifying storage sites having adequate capacity, containment, and injectivity. Petroleum engineers will play a key role in these studies.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. Gary Teletzke and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. Gary Teletzke.

    Dr. Gary Teletzke

    Senior Technical Advisor, Enhanced Oil Recovery, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company

    Dr. Teletzke has led research projects related to gas injection EOR, chemical EOR, and compositional reservoir simulation. He has also led several EOR field studies, integrating laboratory work, reservoir simulation, and pilot testing. For the past ten years, he has provided technical leadership to research efforts on CO2 sequestration. He has published more than 40 technical papers and patents. He has organized numerous SPE conferences over the past two decades and served as Executive Editor of SPEREE from 2015-2017. He was named an SPE Distinguished Member in 2013. He received a BS in chemical engineering from Northwestern University and PhD in chemical engineering from University of Minnesota.

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  • Low Risk – No Fear Deepwater Acid Stimulation: New Wells, Old Wells, Producers, Injectors

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 11/07/2019 at 9:30 AM (EST)

    The presentation reviews and addresses the real and perceived risks and historical fears in acid stimulation, specifically as they relate to deepwater well completions. Discussed are risk-mitigating, production and injection enhancing fluid stages, acid types, additives, stage options, diversion and placement practices, vessel options, flowback practices, and post-stimulation ramp-up and drawdown management. Supporting case examples are also presented.

    Acid stimulation, especially with hydrofluoric (HF) acid in sandstone formations, has been around for over 80 years although historically it has been met with trepidation, if not outright fear. This continues to be the case today, especially in high cost, deepwater well completions; resulting in avoidance where applicable, thereby foregoing production uplift opportunities and leaving oil and gas reserves in the ground.

    Unfortunately, what is largely unappreciated or at least misunderstood, is that the risks and concerns associated with HF acidizing in such wells can be very reasonably addressed. Low to sub-zero skin, new well completions are very possible – and proven – with pre-frac pack HF acid treatments, for example – not a broad industry practice.  Uplift from existing wells with significant damage skins restricting production (or injection) can be substantial with properly custom-designed HF acid treatments.

    The presentation reviews and addresses the real and perceived risks and historical fears in acid stimulation, specifically as they relate to deepwater well completions. Discussed are risk-mitigating, production and injection enhancing fluid stages, acid types, additives, stage options, diversion and placement practices, vessel options, flowback practices, and post-stimulation ramp-up and drawdown management. Supporting case examples are also presented.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Leonard J. Kalfayan and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Leonard J. Kalfayan.

    Mr. Leonard J. Kalfayan

    Principal Advisor and Technical Authority, Production Engineering and Stimlation, Hess Corporation

    Mr. Kalfayan's background is in oil, gas, and geothermal production enhancement; new technology development and implementation; global technical support and business development. Prior to joining Hess in 2009, Leonard worked for the Union Oil Company of California (Unocal), BJ Services, and served as an industry consultant. He was a 2005 SPE Distinguished Lecturer; a 2013 SPE Distinguished Member and served on numerous SPE program and technical committees. He is author of over 30 SPE and other journal publications and holds 15 U.S. patents. Leonard serves as a technical reviewer for the SPE Journal of Petroleum Technology and the Journal of Petroleum Science and Engineering. He is also author of the book, Production Enhancement with Acid Stimulation (in its 2nd edition); co-author of the book The Energy Imperative and co-editor of the SPE Monograph: Acid Stimulation.  

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  • AI/ML Drilling Systems Need Timely Trusted Data to Deliver Trusted Results

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 11/06/2019 at 9:30 AM (EST)

    ​Real-time data now represents a growing stream of scores of channels of digital data being fed concurrently to numerous receiving entities in the operator's remote monitoring amenities, at contractor centers and other facilities. Analytics are applied to data channels to signal or predict deviations from expected readings that require attention. For such systems to work effectively and reliably the input data must be trustworthy.

    Real-time data now represents a growing stream of scores of channels of digital data being fed concurrently to numerous receiving entities in the operator's remote monitoring amenities, at contractor centers and other facilities. Analytics are applied to data channels to signal or predict deviations from expected readings that require attention. For such systems to work effectively and reliably the input data must be trustworthy.

    Establishing trust in a digital, i.e. binary, manner requires more rigor than what would be performed by a human observer. The boundary conditions for trust must be codified into rules that are grouped in a policy suitable for each data stream. Such conditions could include e.g. temperature range for a sensor outside of which readings are invalid.

    The standards-based transmittals of WITSML data can be augmented with Data Assurance that codifies the rules that have established each data sample’s “pass” or “fail” status. To avoid cluttering the transmission channels, samples are transmitted with a blank Data Assurance field if the relevant policy was satisfied; the metadata indicating the rule or rules that were failed and the policy they are attached to are sent only with samples that failed. This information can be ingested by automated analytical tools.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Jay Hollingsworth and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Jay Hollingsworth.

    Jay Hollingsworth

    Chief Technology Officer, Energistics

    Jay Hollingsworth is currently Chief Technology Officer for Energistics. In this role, he is responsible for the technical adequacy of the standards stewarded by the organization, including WITSML, PRODML, and RESQML among others.

    Jay has a BS plus post-graduate studies in Chemical Engineering at Tulane University in New Orleans. In addition, he attended graduate school in Computer Science at University of Texas in Dallas. As his career advanced as an Environmental and Process Engineer, he focused on technical computing – first as a consultant and then for 20 years at Mobil Oil. At Mobil he was responsible for the data model of their FINDER global master data store and the suite of engineering applications in global use. After leaving ExxonMobil, he spent time in Landmark’s data modeling group before settling at Schlumberger. He spent 10 years at Schlumberger where he was responsible for the data modeling group and was the Portfolio manager for the Seabed database technology. After Schlumberger, he was an Industry Principal at Oracle, focusing on oil & gas solutions.

    Jay is active in numerous industry organizations, including APSG, ISO, SPE and SEG. He was a Technical Editor of the SPE Microcomputer Journal and is currently on the Board of the SPE Digital Energy Technical Section. He was a long-time member of the Board of Directors of PPDM and served as past president of APSG.

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