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  • Overview of Sustainable Development Trends

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/18/2013

    Presented by Libby Cheney, Brian Sullivan

    This webinar will address Communication & Disclosure on Sustainability Performance - moderated by the SPE DL Charlie Curlee and expert in sustainability reporting and presented by Brian Sullivan, Executive Director, IPIECA and Elizabeth Cheney, VP Corporate EHS & SR, Hess.

    The online event will cover the range of reporting and rating topics facing corporations - different actors, sensibilities, trends, drivers and challenges in getting valuable information to the right levels of decision maker and decision makers.


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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    Libby Cheney, Hess

    Libby Cheney is Vice President of Corporate Environment, Health, Safety and Social Responsibility for Hess Corporation, a global, integrated energy company based in New York City and Houston.

    In this role, Cheney has responsibility for leading a global team of functional specialists, providing thought leadership on emerging issues for senior management, developing trusted partnerships with key stakeholders; and strengthening the sustainability culture enterprise wide

    Cheney has more than 30 years of leadership experience in sustainability, EHS, strategic planning, operations, engineering and project development.

    She joined Hess in March 2012 from Shell where she spent five years, most recently as Vice President of Safety, Environment, and Sustainable Development for exploration, development and production assets in the Americas. Prior to Shell, Cheney was with ExxonMobil for 24 years where she served in technical and operational roles.

    Cheney hold’s a bachelor's degree in Chemical Engineering from Vanderbilt University. She is active in many civic and professional organizations, including the Offshore Energy Center in Houston, the Society of Petroleum Engineers and the United Way of Greater Houston.


    Charles Curlee, Moderator

    Charlie Curlee worked for over 30 years with Marathon Oil Company, holding Health, Environmental, and Safety (HES) management positions for upstream business units in several U.S. locations. He held successive positions at the corporate level as the company’s International HES Manager, Safety Manager and Senior HES Advisor, where he worked on a broad range of emerging HES-related issues. In 2006, he helped establish a new Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) function within Marathon to focus on sustainability, stakeholder engagement, community programs and social risk assessment processes.

    Throughout his career, Mr. Curlee has actively participated in trade associations and professional organizations as important resources for sharing best practices to successfully address environmental stewardship, occupational health & safety, and sustainable development challenges. He served as Chair of the IPIECA / API / OGP Reporting Task Force (RTF) for four years, culminating in the December 2010 release of the Second Edition of the "Oil and gas industry guidance on voluntary sustainability reporting". With SPE, Charlie functioned as the Safety Program Subcommittee Chair for the 2004 International Health, Safety and Environment Conference in Calgary, Canada and has spoken at several SPE workshops and conferences. He is a SPE Distinguished Lecturer for the upcoming 2013-2014 DL Tour, speaking on sustainability and sustainability reporting in the oil and gas industry.


    Brian Sullivan, IPIECA
    Brian joined IPIECA as the Executive Director in 2011 following a 23 year career in BP. He graduated in Metallurgy and Materials Science from Imperial College, London, UK and was recruited into BP’s Refining and Marketing international graduate programme in 1986.

    Over the course of 23 years, his career included assignments in London, Copenhagen, Budapest, Athens and Johannesburg, and business experience in over 60 countries.

    During his time with BP he has had a varied career of technical, commercial, financial and leadership roles across the downstream value chain including crude and products trading, marine fuels, lubricants and alternative energy.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Defoaming Additives in Horizontal Multiphase Flow – Impact on Flow Regime and Separations

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 09/16/2013

    Presented by Professor Omar K. Matar

    The Effect of Surfactant on Stratified and Stratifying Gas-Liquid Flows

    The inlet conditions of the fluids entering a separation vessel have a significant impact on the performance of the separator. In this webinar we consider the dynamics of a stratified/stratifying gas-liquid flow in horizontal tubes.


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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    Professor Omar K. Matar

    Prof. O. K. Matar (OKM) is an Exxon-Mobil Fellow and Professor of Fluid Mechanics in the Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London. OKM’s current research interests are in the area of multiphase flows with applications in oil-and-gas flow-assurance, crude-oil processing, enhanced oil recovery, process intensification, coating flow technology, and manufacturing. OKM has recently been invited to review the field of thin films in Rev. Mod. Phys. (impact factor 51).

    OKM is the current coordinator of the Fluid Mechanics Focus Area at Imperial and has received £11M funding (£8M as Principal Investigator) from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, UK. OKM is the director of the Transient Multiphase Flow consortium, which comprises a number of oil-and-gas operators (inc. BP, Chevron, Petrobras, Statoil, TOTAL), design- and software-houses. The research council and industrial funding has been used to study phase inversion in concentrated emulsions, flows over rapidly rotating discs (reactors), nonlinear bubble sound interactions, fouling in heat exchangers in crude oil distillation units, dynamics of liquids spreading on compliant substrates, multiphase flow in large-diameter pipes, advanced experimental and numerical methods for the prediction of complex vapour liquid annular flows, and interfacial behaviour in stratified and stratifying annular flows. OKM is also the director of the EPSRC Programme Grant (£5M), MEMPHIS, to produce the next-generation predictive tools for multiphase flows.

    OKM has co-authored 130 articles in prestigious journals and has an h-index of 26. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Multiphase Science and Technology, an Associate Executive Editor of Journal of Engineering Mathematics, and on the Editorial Board of International Journal of Multiphase Flow.

    Projects, Facilities, and Construction Discipline Web Pagehttp://www.spe.org/disciplines/pfc/

    Separations Technology Technical Section Homepagehttp://connect.spe.org/SeparationsTechnology/Home/

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Smart Fields: A Data-Driven Approach to Making Oil Fields Smart

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.15 credits offered Recorded On: 09/11/2013

    This webinar will explore the challenges that our industry face in turning data into information. Presented by Shahab D. Mohaghegh

    This webinar will explore the challenges that our industry face in turning data into information. Where the bottlenecks are. Where we can look for solutions. How solutions can be implemented, and if we are the only industry that has faced or is facing such challenges.


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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    Shahab D. Mohaghegh is the president and CEO of Intelligent Solutions, Inc. (ISI) and Professor of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering at West Virginia University. A pioneer in the application of Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining in the Exploration and Production industry, he holds B.S., MS, and PhD degrees in petroleum and natural gas engineering.

    He has authored more than 150 technical papers and carried out more than 50 projects many of them with major international companies. He is a SPE Distinguished Lecturer and has been featured in the Distinguished Author Series of SPE’s Journal of Petroleum Technology (JPT) four times. He has been honored by the U.S. Secretary of Energy for his technical contribution in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon (Macondo) incident in the Gulf of Mexico and is a member of U.S. Secretary of Energy’s Technical Advisory Committee on Unconventional Resources.

    0.15 CEUs Available

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • New and Emerging Technologies for Oil and Gas Production of Shale

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/30/2013

    Presented by Stephen A. Holditch, George Moridis George E. King

    For this special SPE Webinar event, three industry-leading experts will be presenting the need for and the application of new and emerging technologies for the economic and environmentally-compatible development of shale.


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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    Stephen A. Holditch

    Mr. Holditch, SPE, retired from the Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University in January 2013, and is currently a Professor Emeritus. Holditch led the department from January 2004 to January 2012. Holditch served as SPE president during 2002 and is an Honorary Member and Distinguished Member of SPE. He has earned numerous SPE awards, including the Anthony B. Lucas Award, Lester C. Uren Award, and Distinguished Service Award for Petroleum Engineering Faculty. He earned BS, MS, and PhD degrees in petroleum engineering from Texas A&M.

    George Moridis

    Mr. Moridis has been a Staff Scientist in the Earth Sciences Division of LBNL since 1991, where he is the Deputy Program Lead for Energy Resources. He is in charge of the LBNL research programs on hydrates and tight/shale gas, and leads the development of the new generation of LBNL simulation codes.

    Moridis is a visiting professor in the Petroleum Engineering Dept. at Texas A&M University, and in the Guangzhou Center for Gas Hydrate Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences; he is also an adjunct professor in the Chemical Engineering Dept. at the Colorado School of Mines, and in the Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering Dept. of the Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey. He holds MS and PhD degrees from Texas A&M University and BS and ME degrees in chemical engineering from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece.

    Moridis is the author or coauthor of over 70 papers in peer-reviewed journals, more than 180 LBNL reports, paper presentations and book articles, and three patents. He was a SPE (Society of Petroleum Engineers) Distinguished Lecturer for 2009–10, and was elected a SPE Distinguished Member in 2010. He is the recipient of a 2011 Secretarial Honor Award of the U.S. Department of Energy. He is on the editorial board of three journals, an Associate Editor of four scientific journals, and a reviewer for 26 scientific publications.

    George E. King

    Mr. King is a 47-year veteran of oil and gas research and operations and is Apache Corporation’s Distinguished Engineering Advisor. He is a registered professional engineer and is currently involved in multiple areas of new technologies in the areas of surface modification chemistry, shale fracturing, artificial lift and completions.

    King holds BS degrees in Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and a Masters in Petroleum Engineering. He is a 37-year member of SPE, and also has membership in AAPG and NACE. He has authored over 65 papers and has received the 2004 SPE Production Operations Award and the 2012 Engineer of the year award from the Houston region of the Society of Professional Engineers. He has been a SPE Distinguished Lecturer, on the SPE Distinguished Lecturer Committee from 2003-09 and is a SPE Continuing Education Teacher in shale technology.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Dual Gradient Drilling - 101

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/27/2013

    Presented by John H. Cohen

    This Webinar covers the subject of Dual Gradient Drilling, and starts with an explanation of pore and fracture pressure gradients and their importance in the drilling process, moves on to discuss past and present work on different methods of dual gradient drilling, and a discussion on well control as it related to Dual Gradient Drilling..

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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    H. Cohen, R & D Technology Manager

    John H. Cohen has worked in research and development in the oil industry since his graduation from the Colorado School Mines in Golden, Colorado. His degree in Mineral Engineering Physics has given him a unique view and allowed him to work on a variety of different projects over the past 38 years.

    Mr. Cohen has significant experience in developing and improving down hole tools including; roller cone and PDC drill bits, turbo drills, mud motors, turbine generators, MWD tools, rig instrumentation, and rotary steerable tools. He has also worked on subsea equipment including; riser design, collet connectors, and subsea pumping systems.

    Mr. Cohen was director of The Drilling Research Center, where he developed methods and apparatus for testing oil field equipment, down hole tools and drilling concepts. Included among these was the testing of fluids for a unique method of dual gradient drilling. This interest in new technology and dual gradient drilling continues today with work on subsea pumps and concepts for dual gradient and riserless drilling. Based on his work in developing new equipment Mr. Cohen has authored many papers, and holds several patents. He is former Chairman of the IADC Dual Gradient Drilling Subcommittee, where he works to encourage the development of this new technology.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • MPD and UBD Webinars

    Contains 4 Component(s), 0.25 credits offered Recorded On: 08/26/2013

    Webinars on MPD and UBD

    ***To learn more about each individual session, please click on each tab above. When you register, you are automatically registered for each event in the series.***

    Session I: Managed Pressure Drilling

    Session II: Dual Gradient Drilling - 101


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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    Managed Pressure Drilling includes pressure control methods and technologies tailored to drill previously un-drillable wells and reduce non-productive time in challenging wells such as HPHT, brown field redevelopment projects and exploratory wells. Current methods, technologies and recent improvements will be discussed.

    Speaker

    Don Reitsma, Schlumberger

    Mr. Reitsma, a leading expert in the design and delivery of automated managed pressure drilling systems, is currently vice president, engineering, of the Schlumberger At Balance Service, which initially began with Shell International E&P in The Netherlands.
    Mr. Reitsma holds a masters degree in petroleum engineering from the University of New South Wales, Australia, and has more than 30 years of worldwide upstream industry experience in drilling, completions, workovers, and production with E&Ps, NOCs, and major service providers in both engineering and operations. For the past 10 years, he has focused primarily on developing and delivering automated bottomhole pressure control and automated kick detection systems and contributing to industry acceptance of these systems through participation in SPE and IADC. Mr. Reitsma also holds numerous patents and has written and co-written various technical papers and articles on this subject.

    This Webinar covers the subject of Dual Gradient Drilling, and starts with an explanation of pore and fracture pressure gradients and their importance in the drilling process, moves on to discuss past and present work on different methods of dual gradient drilling, and a discussion on well control as it related to Dual Gradient Drilling.

    Speaker

    H. Cohen, R & D Technology Manager

    John H. Cohen has worked in research and development in the oil industry since his graduation from the Colorado School Mines in Golden, Colorado. His degree in Mineral Engineering Physics has given him a unique view and allowed him to work on a variety of different projects over the past 38 years.

    Mr. Cohen has significant experience in developing and improving down hole tools including; roller cone and PDC drill bits, turbo drills, mud motors, turbine generators, MWD tools, rig instrumentation, and rotary steerable tools. He has also worked on subsea equipment including; riser design, collet connectors, and subsea pumping systems.

    Mr. Cohen was director of The Drilling Research Center, where he developed methods and apparatus for testing oil field equipment, down hole tools and drilling concepts. Included among these was the testing of fluids for a unique method of dual gradient drilling. This interest in new technology and dual gradient drilling continues today with work on subsea pumps and concepts for dual gradient and riserless drilling. Based on his work in developing new equipment Mr. Cohen has authored many papers, and holds several patents. He is former Chairman of the IADC Dual Gradient Drilling Subcommittee, where he works to encourage the development of this new technology.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Prediction of Oil Asphaltene Behavior based on Fluid Characterization – SPE Distinguished Lecture

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/07/2013

    Presented by Artur Stankiewicz

    The Distinguished Lecturer's Program Presents:

    The 'merger' of engineering and geochemical knowledge in the development of asphaltenes technology, has dynamically advanced the area o f flow assurance in the of petroleum industry. While the impact of such integration has been presented at many conferences, the topic is still poorly appreciated.

    Early understanding of the spatial distribution and behaviour of “asphaltene problematic" fluids in a reservoir is a key in the development of any oil field and will lead to introduction of robust prevention and mitigation strategies.


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the


    Artur Stankiewicz

    Mr. Stankiewicz is a Reservoir Fluids Manager and Domain Head responsible for global network of Fluids Laboratories and Water Chemistry and Petroleum Geochemistry in Schlumberger. Until March 2010 he was Shell’s Expert in the area of Geochemistry Fluid Properties and Flow Assurance.

    He holds MSc and PhD in Geology/Organic Geochemistry and has spent 2 years as a Post-Doctoral Assistant at Bristol University, UK before joining Shell Oil in 1998. He led development and implementation of asphaltenes technology in Shell, while also pioneering interdisciplinary focus on hydrocarbon fluid properties and its acquisition via foundation of a unique, integrated Fluid Evaluation and Sampling Technologies Team (FEAST).

    He worked on numerous projects around the world, authored more than 60 articles and 80 conference abstracts, has been an invited lecturer, organizer and chair of numerous international meetings and symposia. He is currently a Chair of the European Association of Organic Geochemists (EAOG), and a member of SPE, AAPG.

    Artur was an SPE Distinguished Lecturer in 2011-12.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Advances On Sparse Representation of Reservoir Properties, Fluid Characterization Methods for Steam-Solvent Co-Injection, and Full-Resolution Simulations of Multi-Scale Processes (20 June was SPE Junior Research Award Winner Presentations – Part 2)

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/10/2013

    Presented by Behnam Jafarpour, Ryosuke Okuno, Rami M. Younis

    High-resolution reservoir imaging for predicting reservoir response to alternative development strategies and thereby optimizing reservoir production performance.

    Reliable fluid characterization is as important as reliable experimental data for coinjection simulation.

    For any subsurface process, what, precisely, is the instantaneous, spatiotemporal support of change?


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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    Behnam Jafarpour, Assistant Professor, Petroleum and Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California

    Behnam Jafarpour is an assistant professor of petroleum and electrical engineering at USC Viterbi School of Engineering. From 2008 to 2011, he served as an assistant professor of petroleum engineering at Texas A&M University. He holds a PhD in environmental engineering and a SM degree in electrical engineering from MIT.

    Jafarpour currently leads the Subsurface Energy and Environmental Systems lab at USC focusing on systems-based approaches to characterization and development of subsurface energy and environmental resources.


    Ryosuke Okuno, Assistant Professor, Petroleum Engineering, University of Alberta

    Ryosuke Okuno has served as an Assistant Professor of Petroleum Engineering in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at the University of Alberta since 2010. His research and teaching interests include enhanced oil recovery, thermal oil recovery, numerical reservoir simulation, thermodynamics, and multiphase behavior.

    Okuno has seven years of industrial experience as a reservoir engineer with Japan Petroleum Exploration Co., Ltd., and is a registered Professional Engineer in Alberta, Canada. He holds BE and ME degrees in Geosystem Engineering from the University of Tokyo, and a PhD degree in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.


    Rami M. Younis, Assistant Professor, University of Tulsa

    Rami M. Younis received his bachelor's degree with Honors in Mechanical Engineering from McGill University, Canada. In 2002 and in 2005 respectively, he received Masters Degrees in both, Petroleum Engineering, and in Scientific Computing and Computational Mathematics from Stanford University, California. He received his Ph.D. in Petroleum Engineering from Stanford University in 2011.

    He has served on the faculty of The University of Tulsa since 2012 and is presently the founder and director of the Future Reservoir Simulation Systems and Technology FURSST industrial affiliates consortium at the McDougall School of Petroleum Engineering. His research interests are at the intersection of Applied Mathematics, Computer Science, and Reservoir Engineering. His work on simulation software is enabling a future where simulators will literally write themselves; he is the original developer of the Automatically Differentiable Expression Templates Library ADETL software. On the numerical solution algorithms front, his work is pioneering iteration-free and globally convergent nonlinear solution algorithms.

    Dr. Younis has served as technical editor for several journals and is currently associate editor for the SPE Journal. He is the organizer of several SIAM minisymposia. He is the recipient of the Ramey, Brigham, and Centennial Teaching Awards from Stanford University.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Advances On Sparse Representation of Reservoir Properties, Fluid Characterization Methods for Steam-Solvent Co-Injection, and Full-Resolution Simulations of Multi-Scale Processes

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/10/2013

    Presented by Behnam Jafarpour, Ryosuke Okuno, Rami M. Younis

    Topic One

    High-resolution reservoir imaging is critical for predicting reservoir response to alternative development strategies and thereby optimizing reservoir production performance. Inference of high-resolution heterogeneous rock properties from low-resolution production measurements leads to a challenging nonlinear inverse problem with many non-unique solutions. The goal of this research is to combine recent advances in signal processing, applied mathematics and computational inverse theory with insights gained from geosciences and multiphase flow in porous media to formulate effective, robust, and geologically consistent frameworks for solving subsurface characterization and imaging inverse problems.

    In this presentation, I first motivate low-rank (sparse) representations for describing reservoir properties and review some of the conventional reduced-order parameterization techniques in reservoir engineering. I then introduce a flexible and robust sparse representation approach for reservoir property description that is inspired by recent developments in sparse signal processing. I present some of our recent research work in sparse history matching and discuss the “sparse geologic dictionaries” as a novel conceptual framework for reservoir model selection and updating under geologic uncertainty.

    Results from several numerical history matching examples illustrate that geologically-inspired sparse representations of rock properties offer important advantages over conventional reduced-order parameterization techniques. We are currently working on extending our formulation to a stochastic formulation for uncertainty quantification. Our future research in this direction will be focused on developing computationally efficient sparse learning algorithms for estimating facies distribution in large-scale realistic history matching problems.

    Topic Two

    Design of steam-solvent coinjection requires accurate representation of multiphase behavior that results from interaction of fluid and energy flow in porous media. Although PVT measurements provide important data at selected pressure-temperature-composition conditions, it is difficult to measure actual phase behavior encountered during in-situ processes. Thus, reliable fluid characterization is as important as reliable experimental data for coinjection simulation.

    The research project proposed for this SPE award is to develop a fluid characterization method for steam-solvent coinjection. It aims to accurately model multiphase behavior of heavy-oil/solvent/water mixtures using the Peng-Robinson equation of state (PR EOS). At most four equilibrium phases are considered; the oleic (L1), gaseous (V), solvent-rich liquid (L2), and aqueous (W) phases.

    A new fluid characterization method is developed based on the concept of perturbation from n-alkanes (PnA). The focus in the first year is on L1-V two phases. The PnA method initially gives pseudo components critical parameters that are optimized for n-alkanes in terms of liquid densities and vapor pressures predictions using the PR EOS. Critical pressures, critical temperatures, and acentric factors for pseudo components are then perturbed in well-defined directions to match PVT data available. The perturbation considers the size of composition space (i.e., the carbon-number range) and the distribution of components in that space.

    Consequently, a lighter oil tends to have a greater sensitivity of the energy density to molecular weight in the PnA method. The energy density is defined as ai/bi, where ai and bi are the attraction and covolume parameters for pseudo component i, respectively. This energy density modeling is the key to development of a universal characterization method that is applicable to a wide range of reservoir fluids.

    The extensive testing of the PnA method uses 77 different reservoir fluids, including near-critical fluids, gas condensate, volatile oil, and heavy oil. Challenging cases include predictions of liquid dropout curves for near-critical gas condensates, where accurate prediction of both volumetric and compositional properties is crucial. Simulation case studies are presented for gas injection processes. Results show that the PnA method requires much fewer pseudo components to correctly model phase behavior during oil displacements, compared to the conventional characterization methods. The PnA method uses only three adjustment parameters in its regression process, regardless of the number of components used. With the PnA method, the PR EOS does not need to correct volumetric predictions using volume shift parameters for the fluids tested.

    In the next year, the PnA method will be extended to L1-L2-V three hydrocarbon phases and L1-L2-V-W four phases. To this end, we have examined prior methods for modeling water-hydrocarbon mixtures, and collected experimental data for such mixtures. Effects of fluid characterization will be also investigated on flash and stability calculations in solvent injection simulation.

    Topic Three

    By revisiting classic analytical methods that were known to Newton, this talk will answer a quintessential question of modern simulation research. For any subsurface process, what, precisely, is the instantaneous, spatiotemporal support of change?

    Coupled nonlinear flow and transport is inherently a multiscale process; flow evolves on a global scale thereby dictating the extent of the system, whereas transport waves travel with a distinctly local spatial support, dictating resolution. This disparity in scales continues to challenge modern numerical simulation strategies which invariably rely on the orthogonal notions of resolution and extent. Through this work, we can develop full-resolution simulations of multiscale processes while only performing computation when and where it is absolutely necessary.


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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    Behnam Jafarpour, Assistant Professor, Petroleum and Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California

    Behnam Jafarpour is an assistant professor of petroleum and electrical engineering at USC Viterbi School of Engineering. From 2008 to 2011, he served as an assistant professor of petroleum engineering at Texas A&M University. He holds a PhD in environmental engineering and a SM degree in electrical engineering from MIT.

    Jafarpour currently leads the Subsurface Energy and Environmental Systems lab at USC focusing on systems-based approaches to characterization and development of subsurface energy and environmental resources.


    Ryosuke Okuno, Assistant Professor, Petroleum Engineering, University of Alberta

    Ryosuke Okuno has served as an Assistant Professor of Petroleum Engineering in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at the University of Alberta since 2010. His research and teaching interests include enhanced oil recovery, thermal oil recovery, numerical reservoir simulation, thermodynamics, and multiphase behavior.

    Okuno has seven years of industrial experience as a reservoir engineer with Japan Petroleum Exploration Co., Ltd., and is a registered Professional Engineer in Alberta, Canada. He holds BE and ME degrees in Geosystem Engineering from the University of Tokyo, and a PhD degree in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.


    Rami M. Younis, Assistant Professor, University of Tulsa

    Rami M. Younis received his bachelor's degree with Honors in Mechanical Engineering from McGill University, Canada. In 2002 and in 2005 respectively, he received Masters Degrees in both, Petroleum Engineering, and in Scientific Computing and Computational Mathematics from Stanford University, California. He received his Ph.D. in Petroleum Engineering from Stanford University in 2011.

    He has served on the faculty of The University of Tulsa since 2012 and is presently the founder and director of the Future Reservoir Simulation Systems and Technology FURSST industrial affiliates consortium at the McDougall School of Petroleum Engineering. His research interests are at the intersection of Applied Mathematics, Computer Science, and Reservoir Engineering. His work on simulation software is enabling a future where simulators will literally write themselves; he is the original developer of the Automatically Differentiable Expression Templates Library ADETL software. On the numerical solution algorithms front, his work is pioneering iteration-free and globally convergent nonlinear solution algorithms.

    Dr. Younis has served as technical editor for several journals and is currently associate editor for the SPE Journal. He is the organizer of several SIAM minisymposia. He is the recipient of the Ramey, Brigham, and Centennial Teaching Awards from Stanford University.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Reservoir Engineering Aspects of Unconventional Reservoirs

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/30/2013

    Presented by Thomas A. Blasingame

    This abbreviated presentation provides a roadmap of practice and theory for reservoir and production engineering that can (and should) be used for the description, assessment, and modeling of unconventional gas systems.

    The presentation represents a "work-in-progress" — the goal is to seed the right questions (rather than provide answers).


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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    Thomas A. Blasingame. Professor of Petroleum Engineering, Texas A&M University

    Dr. Tom Blasingame is a Professor and is the holder of the Robert L. Whiting Professorship in the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University in College Station Texas. He holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Texas A&M University — all in Petroleum Engineering. In teaching and research activities Dr. Blasingame focuses on petrophysics, reservoir engineering, analysis/interpretation of well performance, and technical mathematics.


    Dr. Blasingame's research efforts deal with topics in applied reservoir engineering, reservoir modeling, and production engineering. Dr. Blasingame has made numerous contributions to the petroleum literature in well test analysis, analysis of production data, reservoir management, evaluation of low/ultra-low permeability reservoirs, and general reservoir engineering (e.g., hydrocarbon phase behavior, natural gas engineering, inflow performance relations, material balance methods, and field studies). As of April 2013, Dr. Blasingame has graduated 51 M.S. (thesis), 30 M.Eng. (report, non-thesis), and 10 Ph.D. students, and he has performed several major field studies involving geology, petrophysics, and engineering tasks.

    Dr. Blasingame is a member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), the Society for Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG). Dr. Blasingame is a Distinguished Member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (2000) and he is a recipient of the SPE Distinguished Service Award (2005), the SPE Uren Award (for technology contributions before age 45) (2006), the SPE Lucas Medal (SPE's preeminent technical award) (2012), and he has served as an SPE Distinguished Lecturer (2005-2006). Dr. Blasingame has prepared over 120 technical articles; and he has chaired numerous technical committees and technical meetings. Dr Blasingame also served as Assistant Department Head (Graduate Programs) for the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M from 1997 to 2003, and Dr. Blasingame has been recognized with several teaching and service awards from Texas A&M University.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the