Take yourself to greater depths right from your desktop with SPE Webinars and Online Education.
Join our industry experts as they explore solutions to real problems and discuss trending topics.

Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Prediction of Oil Asphaltene Behavior based on Fluid Characterization – SPE Distinguished Lecture

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/07/2013

    Presented by Artur Stankiewicz

    The Distinguished Lecturer's Program Presents:

    The 'merger' of engineering and geochemical knowledge in the development of asphaltenes technology, has dynamically advanced the area o f flow assurance in the of petroleum industry. While the impact of such integration has been presented at many conferences, the topic is still poorly appreciated.

    Early understanding of the spatial distribution and behaviour of “asphaltene problematic" fluids in a reservoir is a key in the development of any oil field and will lead to introduction of robust prevention and mitigation strategies.


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the


    Artur Stankiewicz

    Mr. Stankiewicz is a Reservoir Fluids Manager and Domain Head responsible for global network of Fluids Laboratories and Water Chemistry and Petroleum Geochemistry in Schlumberger. Until March 2010 he was Shell’s Expert in the area of Geochemistry Fluid Properties and Flow Assurance.

    He holds MSc and PhD in Geology/Organic Geochemistry and has spent 2 years as a Post-Doctoral Assistant at Bristol University, UK before joining Shell Oil in 1998. He led development and implementation of asphaltenes technology in Shell, while also pioneering interdisciplinary focus on hydrocarbon fluid properties and its acquisition via foundation of a unique, integrated Fluid Evaluation and Sampling Technologies Team (FEAST).

    He worked on numerous projects around the world, authored more than 60 articles and 80 conference abstracts, has been an invited lecturer, organizer and chair of numerous international meetings and symposia. He is currently a Chair of the European Association of Organic Geochemists (EAOG), and a member of SPE, AAPG.

    Artur was an SPE Distinguished Lecturer in 2011-12.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Advances On Sparse Representation of Reservoir Properties, Fluid Characterization Methods for Steam-Solvent Co-Injection, and Full-Resolution Simulations of Multi-Scale Processes (20 June was SPE Junior Research Award Winner Presentations – Part 2)

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/10/2013

    Presented by Behnam Jafarpour, Ryosuke Okuno, Rami M. Younis

    High-resolution reservoir imaging for predicting reservoir response to alternative development strategies and thereby optimizing reservoir production performance.

    Reliable fluid characterization is as important as reliable experimental data for coinjection simulation.

    For any subsurface process, what, precisely, is the instantaneous, spatiotemporal support of change?


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

    image



    Behnam Jafarpour, Assistant Professor, Petroleum and Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California

    Behnam Jafarpour is an assistant professor of petroleum and electrical engineering at USC Viterbi School of Engineering. From 2008 to 2011, he served as an assistant professor of petroleum engineering at Texas A&M University. He holds a PhD in environmental engineering and a SM degree in electrical engineering from MIT.

    Jafarpour currently leads the Subsurface Energy and Environmental Systems lab at USC focusing on systems-based approaches to characterization and development of subsurface energy and environmental resources.


    Ryosuke Okuno, Assistant Professor, Petroleum Engineering, University of Alberta

    Ryosuke Okuno has served as an Assistant Professor of Petroleum Engineering in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at the University of Alberta since 2010. His research and teaching interests include enhanced oil recovery, thermal oil recovery, numerical reservoir simulation, thermodynamics, and multiphase behavior.

    Okuno has seven years of industrial experience as a reservoir engineer with Japan Petroleum Exploration Co., Ltd., and is a registered Professional Engineer in Alberta, Canada. He holds BE and ME degrees in Geosystem Engineering from the University of Tokyo, and a PhD degree in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.


    Rami M. Younis, Assistant Professor, University of Tulsa

    Rami M. Younis received his bachelor's degree with Honors in Mechanical Engineering from McGill University, Canada. In 2002 and in 2005 respectively, he received Masters Degrees in both, Petroleum Engineering, and in Scientific Computing and Computational Mathematics from Stanford University, California. He received his Ph.D. in Petroleum Engineering from Stanford University in 2011.

    He has served on the faculty of The University of Tulsa since 2012 and is presently the founder and director of the Future Reservoir Simulation Systems and Technology FURSST industrial affiliates consortium at the McDougall School of Petroleum Engineering. His research interests are at the intersection of Applied Mathematics, Computer Science, and Reservoir Engineering. His work on simulation software is enabling a future where simulators will literally write themselves; he is the original developer of the Automatically Differentiable Expression Templates Library ADETL software. On the numerical solution algorithms front, his work is pioneering iteration-free and globally convergent nonlinear solution algorithms.

    Dr. Younis has served as technical editor for several journals and is currently associate editor for the SPE Journal. He is the organizer of several SIAM minisymposia. He is the recipient of the Ramey, Brigham, and Centennial Teaching Awards from Stanford University.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Advances On Sparse Representation of Reservoir Properties, Fluid Characterization Methods for Steam-Solvent Co-Injection, and Full-Resolution Simulations of Multi-Scale Processes

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/10/2013

    Presented by Behnam Jafarpour, Ryosuke Okuno, Rami M. Younis

    Topic One

    High-resolution reservoir imaging is critical for predicting reservoir response to alternative development strategies and thereby optimizing reservoir production performance. Inference of high-resolution heterogeneous rock properties from low-resolution production measurements leads to a challenging nonlinear inverse problem with many non-unique solutions. The goal of this research is to combine recent advances in signal processing, applied mathematics and computational inverse theory with insights gained from geosciences and multiphase flow in porous media to formulate effective, robust, and geologically consistent frameworks for solving subsurface characterization and imaging inverse problems.

    In this presentation, I first motivate low-rank (sparse) representations for describing reservoir properties and review some of the conventional reduced-order parameterization techniques in reservoir engineering. I then introduce a flexible and robust sparse representation approach for reservoir property description that is inspired by recent developments in sparse signal processing. I present some of our recent research work in sparse history matching and discuss the “sparse geologic dictionaries” as a novel conceptual framework for reservoir model selection and updating under geologic uncertainty.

    Results from several numerical history matching examples illustrate that geologically-inspired sparse representations of rock properties offer important advantages over conventional reduced-order parameterization techniques. We are currently working on extending our formulation to a stochastic formulation for uncertainty quantification. Our future research in this direction will be focused on developing computationally efficient sparse learning algorithms for estimating facies distribution in large-scale realistic history matching problems.

    Topic Two

    Design of steam-solvent coinjection requires accurate representation of multiphase behavior that results from interaction of fluid and energy flow in porous media. Although PVT measurements provide important data at selected pressure-temperature-composition conditions, it is difficult to measure actual phase behavior encountered during in-situ processes. Thus, reliable fluid characterization is as important as reliable experimental data for coinjection simulation.

    The research project proposed for this SPE award is to develop a fluid characterization method for steam-solvent coinjection. It aims to accurately model multiphase behavior of heavy-oil/solvent/water mixtures using the Peng-Robinson equation of state (PR EOS). At most four equilibrium phases are considered; the oleic (L1), gaseous (V), solvent-rich liquid (L2), and aqueous (W) phases.

    A new fluid characterization method is developed based on the concept of perturbation from n-alkanes (PnA). The focus in the first year is on L1-V two phases. The PnA method initially gives pseudo components critical parameters that are optimized for n-alkanes in terms of liquid densities and vapor pressures predictions using the PR EOS. Critical pressures, critical temperatures, and acentric factors for pseudo components are then perturbed in well-defined directions to match PVT data available. The perturbation considers the size of composition space (i.e., the carbon-number range) and the distribution of components in that space.

    Consequently, a lighter oil tends to have a greater sensitivity of the energy density to molecular weight in the PnA method. The energy density is defined as ai/bi, where ai and bi are the attraction and covolume parameters for pseudo component i, respectively. This energy density modeling is the key to development of a universal characterization method that is applicable to a wide range of reservoir fluids.

    The extensive testing of the PnA method uses 77 different reservoir fluids, including near-critical fluids, gas condensate, volatile oil, and heavy oil. Challenging cases include predictions of liquid dropout curves for near-critical gas condensates, where accurate prediction of both volumetric and compositional properties is crucial. Simulation case studies are presented for gas injection processes. Results show that the PnA method requires much fewer pseudo components to correctly model phase behavior during oil displacements, compared to the conventional characterization methods. The PnA method uses only three adjustment parameters in its regression process, regardless of the number of components used. With the PnA method, the PR EOS does not need to correct volumetric predictions using volume shift parameters for the fluids tested.

    In the next year, the PnA method will be extended to L1-L2-V three hydrocarbon phases and L1-L2-V-W four phases. To this end, we have examined prior methods for modeling water-hydrocarbon mixtures, and collected experimental data for such mixtures. Effects of fluid characterization will be also investigated on flash and stability calculations in solvent injection simulation.

    Topic Three

    By revisiting classic analytical methods that were known to Newton, this talk will answer a quintessential question of modern simulation research. For any subsurface process, what, precisely, is the instantaneous, spatiotemporal support of change?

    Coupled nonlinear flow and transport is inherently a multiscale process; flow evolves on a global scale thereby dictating the extent of the system, whereas transport waves travel with a distinctly local spatial support, dictating resolution. This disparity in scales continues to challenge modern numerical simulation strategies which invariably rely on the orthogonal notions of resolution and extent. Through this work, we can develop full-resolution simulations of multiscale processes while only performing computation when and where it is absolutely necessary.


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

    image


    Behnam Jafarpour, Assistant Professor, Petroleum and Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California

    Behnam Jafarpour is an assistant professor of petroleum and electrical engineering at USC Viterbi School of Engineering. From 2008 to 2011, he served as an assistant professor of petroleum engineering at Texas A&M University. He holds a PhD in environmental engineering and a SM degree in electrical engineering from MIT.

    Jafarpour currently leads the Subsurface Energy and Environmental Systems lab at USC focusing on systems-based approaches to characterization and development of subsurface energy and environmental resources.


    Ryosuke Okuno, Assistant Professor, Petroleum Engineering, University of Alberta

    Ryosuke Okuno has served as an Assistant Professor of Petroleum Engineering in the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering at the University of Alberta since 2010. His research and teaching interests include enhanced oil recovery, thermal oil recovery, numerical reservoir simulation, thermodynamics, and multiphase behavior.

    Okuno has seven years of industrial experience as a reservoir engineer with Japan Petroleum Exploration Co., Ltd., and is a registered Professional Engineer in Alberta, Canada. He holds BE and ME degrees in Geosystem Engineering from the University of Tokyo, and a PhD degree in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Texas at Austin.


    Rami M. Younis, Assistant Professor, University of Tulsa

    Rami M. Younis received his bachelor's degree with Honors in Mechanical Engineering from McGill University, Canada. In 2002 and in 2005 respectively, he received Masters Degrees in both, Petroleum Engineering, and in Scientific Computing and Computational Mathematics from Stanford University, California. He received his Ph.D. in Petroleum Engineering from Stanford University in 2011.

    He has served on the faculty of The University of Tulsa since 2012 and is presently the founder and director of the Future Reservoir Simulation Systems and Technology FURSST industrial affiliates consortium at the McDougall School of Petroleum Engineering. His research interests are at the intersection of Applied Mathematics, Computer Science, and Reservoir Engineering. His work on simulation software is enabling a future where simulators will literally write themselves; he is the original developer of the Automatically Differentiable Expression Templates Library ADETL software. On the numerical solution algorithms front, his work is pioneering iteration-free and globally convergent nonlinear solution algorithms.

    Dr. Younis has served as technical editor for several journals and is currently associate editor for the SPE Journal. He is the organizer of several SIAM minisymposia. He is the recipient of the Ramey, Brigham, and Centennial Teaching Awards from Stanford University.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Reservoir Engineering Aspects of Unconventional Reservoirs

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/30/2013

    Presented by Thomas A. Blasingame

    This abbreviated presentation provides a roadmap of practice and theory for reservoir and production engineering that can (and should) be used for the description, assessment, and modeling of unconventional gas systems.

    The presentation represents a "work-in-progress" — the goal is to seed the right questions (rather than provide answers).


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

    image


    Thomas A. Blasingame. Professor of Petroleum Engineering, Texas A&M University

    Dr. Tom Blasingame is a Professor and is the holder of the Robert L. Whiting Professorship in the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University in College Station Texas. He holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Texas A&M University — all in Petroleum Engineering. In teaching and research activities Dr. Blasingame focuses on petrophysics, reservoir engineering, analysis/interpretation of well performance, and technical mathematics.


    Dr. Blasingame's research efforts deal with topics in applied reservoir engineering, reservoir modeling, and production engineering. Dr. Blasingame has made numerous contributions to the petroleum literature in well test analysis, analysis of production data, reservoir management, evaluation of low/ultra-low permeability reservoirs, and general reservoir engineering (e.g., hydrocarbon phase behavior, natural gas engineering, inflow performance relations, material balance methods, and field studies). As of April 2013, Dr. Blasingame has graduated 51 M.S. (thesis), 30 M.Eng. (report, non-thesis), and 10 Ph.D. students, and he has performed several major field studies involving geology, petrophysics, and engineering tasks.

    Dr. Blasingame is a member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), the Society for Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG). Dr. Blasingame is a Distinguished Member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers (2000) and he is a recipient of the SPE Distinguished Service Award (2005), the SPE Uren Award (for technology contributions before age 45) (2006), the SPE Lucas Medal (SPE's preeminent technical award) (2012), and he has served as an SPE Distinguished Lecturer (2005-2006). Dr. Blasingame has prepared over 120 technical articles; and he has chaired numerous technical committees and technical meetings. Dr Blasingame also served as Assistant Department Head (Graduate Programs) for the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M from 1997 to 2003, and Dr. Blasingame has been recognized with several teaching and service awards from Texas A&M University.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Sustainable Development—Local Stakeholder Engagement—A Practitioner’s Perspective

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/26/2013

    Presented by Ilse Castellanos

    Local stakeholder engagement is key to project execution and business success.


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

    image


    Ilse Castellanos, Sustainability Manager, Development and Production International Division, Statoil

    Ilse Castellanos is presently Sustainability Manager in Statoil’s Development and Production International Division (DPI). She is responsible for ensuring compliance with Statoil’s requirements in the country offices located in the Middle East and Africa, Europe and Asia. Prior to this Ilse was the Head of CSR in DPI since Oct 2010. She has held a variety of positions in Statoil Venezuela covering Governmental Relations, Corporate Communications, Procurement, Security and CSR.

    Before joining Statoil in 2001 Ilse held various roles associated with international oil company participation in Venezuela’s oil industry. She holds a Law degree from Venezuela, as well as an Advanced Diploma on Sustainable Development from the University of Cambridge Program for the Industry. Ilse is also a member of the Prince of Wales Sustainability network and member of the WBCSD Future Leaders Forum (2008).

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Sustainable Development—Local Stakeholder Engagement—A Practitioner’s Perspective

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/26/2013

    Presented by Ilse Castellanos

    Local stakeholder engagement is key to project execution and business success.


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

    image


    Ilse Castellanos, Sustainability Manager, Development and Production International Division, Statoil

    Ilse Castellanos is presently Sustainability Manager in Statoil’s Development and Production International Division (DPI). She is responsible for ensuring compliance with Statoil’s requirements in the country offices located in the Middle East and Africa, Europe and Asia. Prior to this Ilse was the Head of CSR in DPI since Oct 2010. She has held a variety of positions in Statoil Venezuela covering Governmental Relations, Corporate Communications, Procurement, Security and CSR.

    Before joining Statoil in 2001 Ilse held various roles associated with international oil company participation in Venezuela’s oil industry. She holds a Law degree from Venezuela, as well as an Advanced Diploma on Sustainable Development from the University of Cambridge Program for the Industry. Ilse is also a member of the Prince of Wales Sustainability network and member of the WBCSD Future Leaders Forum (2008).

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Foaming in Separators: Handling and Operation

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/19/2013

    Presented by Dr. Wally John Georgie

    This discussion will cover topics such as what is foam and how is it generated, detecting foam in separators, effects of foam in a separator, designing for foamy crudes in a new horizontal separator, and examples of overcoming foam problems.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

    image


    Dr. Wally John Georgie, Principal Consultant, Maxoil Solutions, Inc.; Flow Assurance Process, Separation and Produced Water and Sand Management Specialist
    Dr. Georgie has 35 years of experience in the Oil and Gas industry, mainly in oil and gas processing and separation offshore and onshore, namely; operation trouble-shooting, de-bottlenecking, oil water separation and slugging problems, process verification, and all other fluid and gas handling issues, including fluid, production chemistry, flow assurance and integrity management. He worked mainly with the service sector in the USA, UK and ME, between 1979 till 1987 and then followed a career with Statoil in Norway from 1987 till 1999, mainly in daily operation and project operation support and plants troubleshooting of oil and gas facilities.

    Wally has worked as a consultant/advisor with most of the major operators in the North Sea, Gulf of Mexico, Alaska and Australia/Asia, since March 1999 in the area of separation trouble shooting, operation assurance, produced water and sand management, gas handling problems, flow assurance, system integrities and production chemistry.

    Wally is a trained, oil and gas Process Chemist, Technologist, Corrosion Engineer, Safety Engineer, and Process Engineer.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • SPE Junior Research Award Winner Presentations – Part 1

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/18/2013

    Presented by Reza Barati, Zoya Heidari

    Topic One

    This discussion will be about a study done by the Chemical and Petroleum Engineering (C&PE) Department at the University of Kansas on the capability of enzyme-loaded polyelectrolyte complex nanoparticles in cleaning up the filter cake generated by fracturing fluids, and the work done to quantify the effect of organic matter and pore structure on electrical resistivity of organic-rich source rocks using numerical simulations of electrical resistivity in rock-fluid systems.


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

    image


    Reza Barati, Assistant Professor, Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Department, The University of Kansas

    Reza Barati earned his PhD at the University of Kansas. He worked for the Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute (EORI) at the University of Wyoming before joining KU. His research interests include oilfield nanoparticles, characterization and simulation of conventional and tight shale reservoirs, hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling of unconventional shale plays, enhanced waterflooding through modification of injection-brine and CO2 Mobility and conformance control.


    Zoya Heidari, Assistant Professor, Petroleum Engineering Department, Department of Texas A&M University

    Zoya Heidari is an assistant professor at the Petroleum Engineering Department of Texas A&M University and is the Chevron Corporation Faculty Fellow in Petroleum Engineering. She received a Ph.D. (2011) in petroleum engineering from The University of Texas at Austin. Zoya is the director of the Texas A&M Joint Industry Research Program on “Multi-Scale Formation Evaluation and Reservoir Characterization of Unconventional and Carbonate Reservoirs”.

    She is also one of the recipients of 2012 SPE Petroleum Engineering Junior Faculty Research Initiation Award to develop her research program on formation evaluation of unconventional reservoirs. Before joining Texas A&M University, Zoya worked with the Formation Evaluation Research Group at The University of Texas at Austin. Her research interests include petrophysics, well logging, borehole geophysics, inverse problems, rock physics, and reservoir characterization of unconventional reservoirs.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Hydraulic Fracturing: Environmental and Occupational Health Challenges

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 06/05/2013

    Presented by Mr. Michael Parker, Mr. Eric J. Esswein

    The presentation will review ongoing study and advocacy efforts being led by the American Petroleum Institute (API), focusing on EPA's national hydraulic fracturing study and their work in Pavillion Wyoming.

    Occupational health and safety practices to effectively control the chemical and physical hazards of this technology will also be discussed. There is a lack of published information regarding the variety and magnitude of chemical exposure risks to oil and gas extraction workers.


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

    image


    Mr. Michael Parker, Retired, ExxonMobil Production Company - Technical Advisor
    Mr. Parker recently retired after over 35 years of service as a Technical Advisor within ExxonMobil Production Company's Upstream Safety, Health, and Environment organization. Mr. Parker provided technical support and guidance to ExxonMobil affiliates world-wide on a range of issues including drilling and production discharges, underground injection control, spill prevention and control, facility decommissioning, artificial reef programs, marine environmental issues, carbon capture and storage, hydraulic fracturing and general issue management coordination.

    At retirement, Mr. Parker Chaired the American Petroleum Institute’s Upstream Environmental Subcommittee, the Carbon Capture and Storage Work Group and the Hydraulic Fracturing Workgroup and was Upstream Environmental and Regulatory Issue Management Coordinator for ExxonMobil Production Company. Mr. Parker is currently Principal of Parker Environmental and Consulting.

    Mr. Parker is a graduate of the University of Texas and Texas A&M University and is a registered Professional Engineer in Texas and Louisiana. Mr. Parker also serves on the Board of Directors of the Armand Bayou Nature Center.


    Mr. Eric J. Esswein, Captain, USPHS, Sr. Industrial Hygienist, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Western States Office, Denver, CO

    Eric is a Commissioned Officer in the U.S. Public Health Service assigned as a senior industrial to CDC/NIOSH where he has worked for more than 20 years. Eric conducts field-based occupational health research in oil and gas extraction as part of the NIOSH Field Effort to Assess Chemical Exposure Risks for Oil and Gas Workers.

    Eric holds bachelor and master’s degrees in environmental health/toxicology and public health/industrial hygiene and is board certified in the comprehensive practice of industrial hygiene. He is the first named inventor for two patents in the area of chemical detection and decontamination.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

  • Deepwater Well Construction Optimization

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/22/2013

    Presented by JC Cunha

    As our industry moves to new offshore frontiers, with exploration wells being drilled in increasingly deeper waters, this presentation will discuss some of the technical challenges present in such operations, the magnitude of the costs involved, the risks and the need for well-structured planning, operation follow-up and post-drilling analysis. This will include possible risk analysis studies, use of real time data and importance of compliance with safety and environmental standards and regulations. An approach to optimize deepwater drilling operations will be described.


    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

    image


    JC Cunha is Drilling Manager for Ecopetrol America where he is responsible for the company’s offshore operations in the GOM and gives support for Ecopetrol offshore operations in South America. Prior to his current position JC was Well Operations Manager for Petrobras America working on the company’s ultra-deepwater drilling program in the GOM.

    Previously Dr. Cunha was a professor at the University of Alberta in Canada and before that he held several technical and managerial positions for Petrobras and Petrobras International in projects in South America, the GOM and Africa.

    He has authored more than 50 technical papers and also wrote chapters for two recently published SPE books. JC has a PhD in petroleum Engineering from the University of Tulsa, USA. A past JPT Editorial Committee Chair, JC is currently the co-chair for the SPE Technical Communities Coordinating Committee (TC-CC).

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the