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  • When Rocks Stop Leaks: Geological Barriers In Well Integrity

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/24/2018

    This presentation will review what we know and try to answer certain questions so we can truly "engineer" geological barriers and achieve effective and robust well integrity.

    Annular isolation is a fundamental aspect of well integrity, the discipline that aims to keep well fluids under control. This is particularly true when wells are abandoned and we need to prevent leaks for a very long time: requirements to log and fix defects clash with time and budget constraints.

    Flow from permeable formations is prevented (and mitigated) through the use of barriers. Traditionally the separation of roles between natural and man-made barriers has been clear cut: once the original impermeable caprock has been pierced by drilling, the annulus must be isolated by pumping cement.

    However this simple picture has evolved through the recognition that some rocks can also act as annular barriers. Creeping formations such as halides, mudstones and possibly ice can seal uncemented sections and large defects in the cement sheath. More importantly, the radial stress they exert reduces debonding and the barrier heals itself again and again, making it robust.

    If creeping formations are to become a fundamental element in well design and evaluation, they need to be properly understood and modeled. From an engineering point of view, we need answers to three questions: how can we recognize a geological barrier? How hard it will grip casing and cement, and how fast can it bridge a gap? How will it fail, and how much can leak past it? This presentation will review what we know and try to answer these questions so we can truly "engineer" geological barriers and achieve effective and robust well integrity.

    Matteo Loizzo

    Well Integrity Consultant/Trainer

    Mr. Loizzo provides technical and process consulting to operators and service companies, helping them extract value from well integrity. His previous career with Schlumberger spanned field operations, research & development, QHSE and carbon dioxide (CO2) geological storage. His current research interests include harnessing geological barriers, modeling leaks through cement, risk management and methane emissions from oil & gas wells. Loizzo has authored and/or coauthored 29 technical papers, a book chapter on CO2 geological storage and 7 patent applications. He holds an master’s degree in aerospace engineering from Rome university “La Sapienza”, Italy and is a member of SPE. Mr. Loizzo is also the incoming Membership Chair of SPE’s Well Integrity Technical Section.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Public Private Partnership for (PPP4) Global Health Threats

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/24/2018

    This panel session will cover topics regarding how we need to be better prepared for global health threats and how partnerships are the way to go for adequate preparedness and response.

    You may not be able to make it to Houston, but you can still join in on this special event! This Health Webinar & Face to Face Hybrid Session includes panelists from the U.S. Agency for International Development, ExxonMobil, US Centers for Disease Control and Management Sciences for Health. It will cover topics regarding how we need to be better prepared for global health threats and how partnerships are the way to go for adequate preparedness and response.

    Objectives include:

    - Describe Global health threat aspects: risks and consequences
    - Understand what are the drivers for the Oil and Gas industry engagement in global health threat aspects
    - Discuss key global health preparedness and response initiatives and potential partnerships at global and local levels

    Register today for this 90 minutes session and get a chance to ask your questions live to the panelists! If you can't watch live, you will have access to the archive version to view at your convenience.

    Dr. Dennis Carroll

    Director, U.S. Agency for International Development’s (USAID’s) Global Health Security and Development Unit

    In this position Dr. Carroll is responsible for providing strategic and operational leadership for the agency's programs addressing new and emerging disease threats. Dr. Carroll also serves as USAID's special representative for global health security. Dr. Carroll was initially detailed to USAID from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as a senior public health advisor in 1991. In 1995 he was named the agency's senior infectious diseases advisor, responsible for overseeing the agency's programs in malaria, tuberculosis, antimicrobial resistance, disease surveillance, as well as neglected and emerging infectious diseases. In this capacity Dr. Carroll was directly involved in the development and introduction of a range of new technologies for disease prevention and control, including: community-based delivery of treatment of onchocerciasis, rapid diagnostics for malaria, new treatment therapies for drug-resistant malaria, intermittent therapy for pregnant women, and “long-lasting” insecticide treated bed nets for prevention of malaria. He was responsible for the initial design and development of the President’s Malaria Initiative. Dr. Carroll officially left CDC and joined USAID in 2005 when he assumed responsibility for leading the USAID response to the spread of avian influenza. Dr. Carroll has a doctorate in biomedical research with a special focus in tropical infectious diseases from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He was a research scientist at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory where he studied the molecular mechanics of viral infection. Dr. Carroll has received awards from both CDC and USAID, including the 2006 USAID Science and Technology Award for his work on malaria and avian influenza, and the 2008 Administrator’s Management Innovation Award for his management of the agency’s Avian and Pandemic Influenza program.


    Hugh Thompson

    Executive Vice President, ExxonMobil Production Company

    Before being named to his current assignment, Mr. Thompson held the position of Vice President, Asia Pacific, ExxonMobil Production Company in Houston for more than two years. Prior to his assignment in Houston, Mr. Thompson was the Director and Chairman of the ExxonMobil Subsidiaries in Malaysia.  

    A native of Scotland, he graduated from Heriot Watt University in Edinburgh, Scotland with a Master's degree in Petroleum Engineering.  

    He joined ExxonMobil in 1988. Over the past 20 years he has held positions of increasing responsibility in assignments ranging from Engineering and Operations management, project management and strategic business planning. He has spent the majority of his career in international assignments working in Aberdeen, London and Malaysia as well as domestic assignments in New Orleans, California and Houston.  

    Mr. Thompson is a member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers. 

    Hugh and his wife Doreen have three children. He enjoys spending time with his family, golfing, skiing and traveling.


    Ashley Arabasadi

    Policy Advisor, No More Epidemics campaign

    Ms. Ashley has over 10 years experience in international health and development. Ashley has worked for International Medical Corps, where she led the organization's efforts on the Global Health Security Agenda; and USAID, where she worked in the Global Health Bureau's Office of Health, Infectious Disease and Nutrition office supporting the Child Survival Health Grants program and the Leadership Initiative for Public Health in East Africa program. She has worked in Afghanistan, Myanmar, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, Vietnam, Thailand, and the Middle East. Ashley holds a BA from Indiana University and an MSc from the University of Durham, England.


    Dr. Judith Monroe

    President and CEO, CDC Foundation

    Dr. Monroe’s professional focus has centered on the intersection of primary care and public health. Her career has taken her from private medical practice to academia, hospital administration and public health protection. In February 2016, Monroe was named president and CEO of the CDC Foundation. The CDC Foundation mobilizes philanthropic and private-sector resources to support the Centers for Disease Control and Preventions (CDC) critical health protection work. The Foundation manages over 250 CDC-led programs in the United States and in more than 100 countries.

    Prior to joining the CDC Foundation, Monroe worked for six years as a CDC deputy director and served as director of the Office for State, Tribal, Local and Territorial Support (OSTLTS). At CDC, Monroe oversaw key activities and technical assistance supporting the nation’s health departments and the public health system.

    Before joining CDC, Monroe served as the state health commissioner for Indiana from 2005 to 2010. She was president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) from 2008 to 2009.

    Monroe has served on many national advisory committees and boards, such as the Public Health Accreditation Board, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Public Health Leadership Forum, and the Institute of Medicine’s Roundtable on Population Health. She currently serves on the board of directors for the Georgia Global Health Alliance, National Advisory Committee for the Indiana University Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health, External Advisory Committee for Purdue University Public Health Graduate Program, and the Executive Management Team for the Food Fortification Initiative.

    Monroe received her doctor of medicine from the University of Maryland and a bachelor of science degree from Eastern Kentucky University. She completed her residency in family medicine at the University of Cincinnati, a rural faculty development fellowship through East Tennessee State University, and a mini-fellowship in obstetrics through the University of Wisconsin. She also participated in the State Health Leadership Initiative at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and received an honorary doctorate from Purdue University in Health and Human Services.

    CAPT Nancy Knight

    Director, Division of Global Health Protection, CDC

    CAPT Knight has worked for CDC for the past ten years.  Currently, she serves as the Director for the Division of Global Health Protection. Formerly, CAPT Knight was the Country Director for CDC-South Africa. Prior to her arrival in South Africa, CAPT Knight served in Kenya as the Director of CDC’s Division of Global HIV and TB‎, and in Nigeria as CDC’s Assistant Director for Clinical Programs for PEPFAR and then as CDC Country Director, where she also provided medical care to the mission community at the Embassy Health Unit in Abuja. 

    Throughout her international career, she has led the development, coordination, and implementation of key public health policies and programs.  She provided the oversight and direction to the interagency PEPFAR program in each of these countries, which received $450-$500M annually. She has extensive experience advancing public health priorities through her leadership and close collaboration with government officials and partners.

    CAPT Knight began her career with the U.S. government in HRSA’s Bureau of Health Professions in 2001, serving in several different roles, including Branch Chief of the Primary Care Medical Education Branch, Division of Medicine and Dentistry, and Deputy Director, Division of Medicine and Dentistry.  CAPT Knight’s work in the division focused on improving the quality of primary care medical education and services in the United States, and included management of a budget of $93M and more than 450 grants annually.  She has also worked in public health at the local government level with the City of Cincinnati Health Department, providing primary healthcare services and working on a number of response teams responsible for local and regional disaster response planning and coordination.

    CAPT Knight received her Bachelor of Arts in Biology and Psychology from Washington University.  She attended the University Of North Carolina School Of Medicine at Chapel Hill, where she graduated with Honors.  She completed her residency training in Family Medicine at the University of Cincinnati, and she is Board Certified in Family Medicine.  Prior to medical school, CAPT Knight served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Lesotho, where she worked as a secondary school science teacher.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Measurement and Improvement of Safety Climate

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/18/2018

    Prof. Dov Zohar will explain the components of Safety Climate and its role in a Safety Management System. He will also summarize case studies and strategies for its improvement, and explain how Safety Climate can be bench marked and reliably compared across organizations.

    The importance of "Safety Culture" is increasingly recognized as a key element of safe operations. It is acknowledged as being a concept that is difficult to measure (National Academies, Strengthening the Safety Culture of the Oil and Gas Industry, 2016) and is defined by the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) as having nine separate characteristics.

    "Safety Climate" on the other hand is a measure of employees’ socially-shared beliefs about the workplace and the behaviors that they feel are likely to be supported. Safety Climate can be easily and quickly measured, and offers a clear measure of organizations’ true priorities. It provides a universal and cost-effective safety management tool that enables comparison between corporate units, even those that use different technologies and perform different jobs. 

    Prof. Dov Zohar will explain the components of Safety Climate and its role in a Safety Management System. He will also summarize case studies and strategies for its improvement, and explain how Safety Climate can be bench marked and reliably compared across organizations.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the
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  • Drillbotics

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/09/2018

    This webinar provides you with the latest update on the SPE DSATs Drillbotics Competition.

    Today, the buzzword we hear about drilling often mentions drilling a well autonomously. This focus led SPE DSATs to establish the Drillbotics Competition three years ago. Last year, SPE DSATs gave seven tertiary institutions the opportunity to design and deploy novel ideas to test their engineering skills through the Drillbotics competition. University teams competed with a rig that must drill hands-free.  The seven schools utilized their multidisciplinary teams to build a miniature automated robotic drilling rig inside a lab, and when they finished, used the rig to drill a test formation provided by DSATS. The DSATs committee evaluated the results and four schools were awarded prizes based on the scope of design, its applications and performance. 

    This webinar will showcase 4 out of the seven schools, their design models, how they overcame challenges, and their final presentations.  See how they dealt with drilling dysfunctions and what they learned that is not in the text books.  

    Session Format

    This webinar is a 1-hour presentation followed by a 30-minute Q&A session.

    Melissa Lee

    UT Austin

    Ms. Lee received her Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Rice University, and is currently pursuing a Doctorate degree in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. At UT Austin, she is involved in drilling automation research, and is part of the Mechanical Engineering Robotics Portfolio Program. She was the team lead of the UT Austin team for both the 2016 and 2017 DrillboticsTM Competitions. She primarily worked on the structural design and diagnosis, and assisted with the torque sensing system and controls.

    Patrick Dolan

    University of Oklahoma, Norman

    Mr. Dolan is an accelerated petroleum engineering/MBA student at the University of Oklahoma, Norman, expecting to graduate in May 2018.  He is currently working on a paper for publication analyzing 12,000 Bakken wells.  He plans to seek employment as a petroleum engineer after graduation. 

    Jens Helberg

    TU Clausthal

    Mr. Helberg is a currently a Petroleum Engineering student and will complete his Master’s degree in drilling & production. In addition Jens holds a Master’s degree in Mining Engineering from the RWTH Aachen University. He currently serves as Vice President for the TU Clausthal SPE Student Chapter and is an active firefighter in his local community.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the
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  • 3-D and 4-D Seismic

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Introduces 3-D seismic techniques used in exploration and reservoir delineation. Describes operations involved in 3-D surveys, including field work, processing and interpretation.

    Description:

    Introduces 3-D seismic techniques used in exploration and reservoir delineation. Describes operations involved in 3-D surveys, including field work, processing and interpretation.
    Presents a comprehensive look at 3-D techniques, including acquisition, processing and interpretation. Discusses acquisition methods and quality control for land and marine surveys. Addresses velocity analyses, trace binning, NMO and migration. Examines time slices, chair displays and other 3-D displays. Illustrates role and capabilities of the workstation in 3-D interpretation. 4-D Seismic, also known as time-lapse monitoring is intended to highlight the differences between successive vintages of 3-D seismic surveys that are caused by changes in reservoir properties due to production.

    Duration: 3 hours

    Content: 

    • 3-D Seismic Techniques: An Overview
    • 3-D Seismic Data Acquisition
    • 3-D Seismic Data Processing
    • 3-D Interpretation Basics
    • 3-D Interpretation in Practice
    • Overview of 3-D Volume Visualization
    • 4-D Seismic Applications
    • 3-D and 4-D Seismic: Exercises
    • 3-D and 4-D Seismic: References and Additional Information

    0.30 CEUs offered.

    Members : USD 115.00

    Non-members : USD 150.00

  • Microseismic Studies of Reservoirs

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This course introduces the basics of using microseismic surveys to study hydrocarbon reservoirs.

    Description:

    This course introduces the basics of using microseismic surveys to study hydrocarbon reservoirs. A microseismic survey is a 3D technology used to monitor subsurface processes by analyzing microearthquakes. Microearthquakes occur when production, injection or hydraulic fracturing cause changes in the pore pressure of a hydrocarbon reservoir that trigger slippage on bedding planes or fractures. The course begins with basic topics required to understand microseismic events and then discusses applications of microseismic surveys. Among the applications are monitoring fracture stimulation operations and relating production to microseismic data. The course includes examples, exercises and offers a list of digital papers for those interested in more information about a particular topic.

    Duration: 5 hours, 20 minutes

    Content: 

    • Applications for Microseismic Surveys
    • Anatomy of Microseismic Events
    • Relating Stress and Pore Pressure to Microseismic Events
    • Failure Criteria for Microearthquakes
    • Getting a First Velocity Model for Event Location
    • Updating the Velocity Using Microseismic Events
    • Source Mechanisms of Microearthquakes
    • Interpreting Microseismic Patterns and Source Mechanism Evolution
    • Monitoring Shale Gas Through Hydraulic Fracturing
    • Microseismic Monitoring Reservoirs without Hydraulic Fracturing
    • Estimating Reservoir Properties using Microseismic Events
    • Determining the Best Interval for Production
    • Surface Seismic Compliment to Microseismic Surveys
    • The Future of Microseismic Developments
    • Microseismic: Exercises
    • Microseismic: References and Additional Information

    0.53 CEUs offered.

    Members : USD 115.00

    Non-members : USD 150.00

  • Hydraulic Fracturing

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Introduces fundamental concepts of hydraulic fracturing and describes the tools, equipment, materials and procedures involved in hydraulic fracturing treatments.

    Description:

    Introduces fundamental concepts of hydraulic fracturing and describes the tools, equipment, materials and procedures involved in hydraulic fracturing treatments. Discusses theoretical and practical aspects of job design, execution and evaluation, including case studies and examples of successful treatments.

    Duration: 6 hours, 30 minutes

    Content: Hydraulic Fracturing Fundamentals

    • Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids
    • Proppants
    • Fracturing Equipment and Operations
    • Fracture Treatment Design
    • Hydraulic Fracturing Treatment Evaluation

    0.65 CEUs offered.

    Members : USD 115.00

    Non-members : USD 150.00

  • Risk Analysis Applied to Petroleum Investments

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Introduces concepts of risk and uncertainty as they apply to the oil and gas industry

    Description:

    Introduces concepts of risk and uncertainty as they apply to the oil and gas industry. Describes risk analysis models, measures of profitability and other decision-making tools. Reviews principles of probability distribution and introduces the Monte Carlo simulation model. Presents procedures for running simulation models using @RISK software. Discusses the role of competitive bidding in the petroleum industry.

    Duration: 1 hour, 40 minutes

    Content: 

    • Risk Analysis Fundamentals
    • Probability Distributions
    • Monte Carlo Simulation Models
    • Competitive Bidding
    • Risk Analysis Applied to Petroleum Investments: References and Additional Information

    0.17 CEUs offered.

    Members : USD 115.00

    Non-members : USD 150.00

  • Introduction to Unconventional Resources

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This topic reviews the categories of unconventional oil and gas resources such as shale reservoirs, tight gas sands, coal bed methane, and heavy oil.

    Description:

    This topic reviews the categories of unconventional oil and gas resources such as shale reservoirs, tight gas sands, coal bed methane, and heavy oil. Development, field development, and specialized processes applied to each of these categories are also discussed. Finally, the estimation of available resources and reserves estimations is examined for each category and several case studies are provided.

    Duration: 7 hours

    Content: 

    • Introduction to Unconventional Resource Types
    • Introduction to Unconventional Resource Development
    • Shale Reservoirs
    • Tight Gas Sands and Their Development
    • Coal Bed Methane Reservoirs and Their Development
    • Extra-Heavy Oil Resources

    0.70 CEUs offered.

    Members : USD 115.00

    Non-members : USD 150.00

  • Seismic Data Acquisition

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Upon completion of the course, the learner will be able to: understand the primary principles of seismic survey design, identify the basic concepts and field operations involved in seismic data acquisition, contrast differences between 2-D and 3-D acquisition, describe key elements of marine vs. non-marine acquisition, evaluate horizontal and vertical seismic resolution, and evaluate practical considerations in survey design. .

    Description:

    Select the most favorable seismic acquisition configuration for the area of interest. Select source and receiver array for proposed survey. Evaluate trade-off between 2-D and 3-D acquisition for the exploration objective. Upon completion of the course, the learner will be able to: understand the primary principles of seismic survey design, identify the basic concepts and field operations involved in seismic data acquisition, contrast differences between 2-D and 3-D acquisition, describe key elements of marine vs. non-marine acquisition, evaluate horizontal and vertical seismic resolution, and evaluate practical considerations in survey design. 

    Duration:  8 hours

    Content:

    • Analyzing the prospect
    • Areal Extent
    • Group and Source Intervals
    • Marine Constraints



    0.8 CEUs offered.

    Members : USD 115.00

    Non-members : USD 150.00