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  • Collaborative Negotiation Skills

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 10/15/2019 at 8:30 AM (EDT)

    The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary. Successful negotiations, as measured by a win-–win agreement, require that you invest time and effort in managing your negotiation from start to finish. It is a lot of work, but it is worth the effort needed to secure a win-win outcome. This webinar will reference many concepts, processes, and tools that you can use to achieve a win-win outcome.

    Business-to-Business (B2B) Collaborative Negotiations: The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary. Successful negotiations, as measured by a win-–win agreement, require that you invest time and effort in managing your negotiation from start to finish. It is a lot of work, but it is worth the effort needed to secure a win-win outcome. This webinar will reference many concepts, processes, and tools that you can use to achieve a win-win outcome. Negotiations are a normal part of an ongoing business relationship with your suppliers, customers and business partners. The goal of this webinar is to provide you with the skills needed to conduct a successful negotiation while strengthening the relationship between you and the other party. It is not unusual, even after preparing a detailed scope of work, that the other party wishes to change your offer. You should never feel your submitted offer is final, so in a spirit of collaborative negotiation, it is your responsibility to work with the other party to better satisfy their needs and still maintain the value of your offer. This is achieved by taking a flexible approach to finding mutually beneficial trades to modify the offer. This webinar describes the processes you can follow to prepare and skillfully manage the negotiation meeting to arrive at a win–win agreement. Finally, you know that not all negotiators will come to a negotiation with the principled win-win approach.  The other party may use pressuring tactics to obtain a concession from you in an effort to secure a better deal for them. The last part of this wibnar discusses how to effectively handle competitive negotiators in an effort to get them back on track to finding a win–win agreement. 

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by JP Amlin and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from JP Amlin.

    JP Amlin

    Senior Training Consultant

    Mr. Amlin is a Senior Training Consultant with extensive experience in the technology and energy industries working with suppliers and operators. JP delivers fundamental and advanced sales programs to sell side companies and contract management to buy side companies globally.  He is the author of several publications relating to marketing, complex sales and advanced contracting methods.

    Prior to becoming a consultant, JP was Manager of Worldwide Sales Training for Schlumberger for 13 years. In this role he developed the content of Schlumberger’s sales training program, consisting of 15 different programs covering basic, intermediate and advanced training in selling skills, strategic sales plan development and execution, account management, sales management, negotiations, and demand generation. Prior to leading the sales training organization, JP was Vice President of Information Technology for Schlumberger’s Asia and Middle East regions. JP was also President of Schlumberger Indonesia and lived in Indonesia for 14 years. Prior to his roles in APAC, JP led the Schlumberger sales force in Canada and Alaska and brings a wealth of real-world experience in executive level operations management, sales and sales management.


     

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  • Oil and Gas in the Era of Decarbonization

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 10/10/2019 at 11:30 AM (EDT)

    The new abundance of natural gas resources (from both conventional and unconventional sources) and ever-expanding LNG capabilities provide opportunities for fuel switching from coal to natural gas around the world.

    The new abundance of natural gas resources (from both conventional and unconventional sources) and ever-expanding LNG capabilities provide opportunities for fuel switching from coal to natural gas around the world. As demonstrated by the dramatic decrease in CO2 emissions associated with electrical power generation in the United States, fuel switching from coal to natural gas has the potential to yield immediate, and significant, climate benefits in many countries around the world. The benefits to air quality are equally important in many areas where coal-related air pollution poses a significant threat to human health. In addition, the widespread availability of global gas resources (and natural gas liquids) has the potential to provide critically needed thermal fuels for cooking and heating in the developing world and obviating the dramatic health impacts associated with indoor air pollution. Finally, to limit global warming to 2°C (as agreed to in the Paris Accords) massive amounts of CO2 need to be sequestered in the subsurface by mid-century. Extensive use of depleted oil and gas reservoirs for CO2 storage represents the only reasonable strategy for sequestering sufficient volumes of CO2 to significantly reduce GHG emissions and thus positively limit climate change. The oil and gas industry of the future needs to be in the businesses of producing hydrocarbons and sequestering CO2.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. Mark D. Zoback and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. Mark D. Zoback.

    Dr. Mark D. Zoback

    Stanford University

    Dr. Zoback is the Benjamin M. Page Professor of Geophysics at Stanford University, Director of the Stanford Natural Gas Initiative and Co-Director of the Stanford Center for Induced and Triggered Seismicity as well as the Co-Director of the Stanford Center for Carbon Storage.  Dr. Zoback conducts research on in situ stress, fault mechanics, and reservoir geomechanics with an emphasis on shale gas, tight gas and tight oil production. He is the author of a textbook entitled Reservoir Geomechanics published by Cambridge University Press in 2007, now in its 15th printing and is the author/co-author of approximately 400 technical papers. His online course in reservoir geomechanics has been completed by approximately 10,000 students from around the world. His newest book, entitled Unconventional Reservoir Geomechanics (written with former PhD student Arjun Kohli), was published by Cambridge University Press in 2019. Dr. Zoback has received a number of awards and honors including election to the U.S. National Academy of Engineering in 2011.  He served on the National Academy of Engineering committee investigating the Deepwater Horizon accident and the Secretary of Energy’s committee on shale gas development and environmental protection. He currently serves as the Chair-elect of the SPE Technical Committee on CCUS as well as the SPE Task Force on Climate Change.

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  • How Do We Quantify Subsurface Uncertainty and Reduce It?

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 10/02/2019 at 9:30 AM (EDT)

    ​All subsurface models derived from seismic and offset well data have uncertainties inherent in the data even after all possible steps have been taken to process the data to maximize the accuracy. There is, however, one more step that could be taken – to quantify the remaining uncertainty. This is a relatively new technology that has value in exploration and drilling. For drilling applications this means a statistical 3D earth model at the well location instead of a fixed, deterministic one.

    All subsurface models derived from seismic and offset well data have uncertainties inherent in the data even after all possible steps have been taken to process the data to maximize the accuracy. There is, however, one more step that could be taken – to quantify the remaining uncertainty. This is a relatively new technology that has value in exploration and drilling. For drilling applications this means a statistical 3D earth model at the well location instead of a fixed, deterministic one.

    The drilling marker positions (depths) are represented as the best estimate plus an uncertainty distribution, for example 10% - 90% probability window, around it. Similarly pore pressure estimates, derived from velocities, come with confidence bounds. Statistical subsurface enables better well plans and contingencies before the spud and better decision making while drilling.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. Cengiz Esmersoy and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. Cengiz Esmersoy.

    Dr. Cengiz Esmersoy

    Technology Advisor, Schlumberger

    Dr. Esmersoy is a Technology Advisor with Schlumberger in the areas of geophysics, drilling, logging, and integrated solutions. He has a large number of publications and received Hart's E&P Meritorious Award for Engineering Innovation (twice), OTC Spotlight on Technology Award (twice), the SEG Best Paper at The Leading Edge award, and a number of company recognitions including the Performed by Schlumberger Chairman's Award. Cengiz has a Ph.D. from M.I.T. and has been active with SEG, SPE, EAGE, and SPWLA, serving in many committees and organizing events. He has been the GEOPHYSICS Associate Editor and the Chairman of the SEG Research Committee.

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  • Wax Deposition and Hydrate Transport Modeling for Flow Assurance and Its Application in Field Design

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 09/26/2019 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    This webinar will describe the wax deposition and hydrate transport models chosen and the importance of its integration into a generic, but well proven multiphase transient simulator framework. The use and importance of these integrated flow assurance models will be briefly demonstrated through a field conceptual design application with results.

    To minimize capital costs, operating companies are choosing to produce oil and gas through longer and longer subsea tie-backs. Transportation of multiphase gas, oil and aqueous mixture over long pipelines under high pressure and low subsea temperatures present some unique challenges. One of the most important challenges in flow assurance for such more common long pipeline designs is the possibility of blockage due to hydrate formation and/or wax deposition.

    This webinar will describe the wax deposition and hydrate transport models chosen and the importance of its integration into a generic, but well proven multiphase transient simulator framework. The use and importance of these integrated flow assurance models will be briefly demonstrated through a field conceptual design application with results.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. Neeraj Zambare and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. Neeraj Zambare.

    Dr. Neeraj Zambare

    Product Director of LedaFlow, Kongsberg Digital

    Dr. Zambare is responsible for the business development, R&D and strategy of LedaFlow, a well-known transient multiphase flow simulator, which is one of the rare available options in the market for high fidelity transient flow assurance work. Throughout his career, Dr. Zambare has worked in the area of dynamic simulation with oil and gas industry as the main focus. He has consulted on various deep water, shallow water and onshore assets from early design phase of projects to operations. He has nearly 20 years of experience in building, delivering and consulting on training simulator systems, real-time online systems, flow assurance studies and process engineering studies. Prior to his role with LedaFlow, he has held focused technical roles as Product Manager of K-Spice (dynamic Process Simulation software) and Principal Engineer for Real-time online advisory systems. He has many technical papers to his credit and also gave number of presentations at various conferences and workshops. He has a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Drexel University.

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  • Using Downhole Fiber Optic Temperature Sensing Technology to Monitor, Control and Improve Well Performance

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 09/18/2019 at 9:30 AM (EDT)

    Presented by Dr. Ding Zhu

    Downhole sensing technology today provide engineers continuous measurements for flow condition diagnosis. The measurements include temperature, pressure, acoustic, and strain, with distributed temperature sensors (DTS) and distributed acoustic sensors (DAS) being more commonly used compared with other measurements. Since the optical fiber technology introduced to the industry, it has advanced dramatically. Many field applications have been proven effective and beneficial. From downhole flow condition characterization, we can diagnose flow problems, monitor, control, and optimize producing and injecting well performance, monitor well stimulation, both matrix acidizing and hydraulic fracturing, and optimize treatment designs. There are rich field application examples to show the potential of the technology.

    One of the keys of applying downhole sensing technology is to develop models and methodologies to interpret the senor measurements. This is challenging, because from data collection and processing, to model development, to invert the measured parameters to flow profiles, it is extremely mathematical and computationally intensive. In this lecture, we will review current status of downhole sensing technology, explain the available models and approaches for interpretation, and present field application examples including production profiling, horizontal well flow control, matrix acidizing optimization and multi-stage hydraulic fracture diagnosis. The lecture is based on publications by the author and other SPE publications. The lecture illustrates the power of DTS as a tool for production problem diagnosis and well performance optimization.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. Ding Zhu and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. Ding Zhu.

    Dr. Ding Zhu

    Professor, Petroleum Engineering Department, Texas A&M University

    Dr. Zhu holds a BS degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Science and Technology, Beijing, China, a MS and PhD degree in Petroleum Engineering, both from the University of Texas at Austin. Her research areas are production engineering, well stimulation, intelligent well modeling and complex well-performance optimization. Dr. Zhu is an author of more than 150 technical papers, a co-author of text book, Petroleum Production Systems (2nd edition), and a co-author of a SPE book, Multilateral Wells. She has been a committee member and chairperson for many conferences and events with Society of Petroleum Engineers, and is currently an associate editor for SPE Production and Operation Journal. She is a Distinguished Member of SPE.

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  • Transparency in Measurements

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 09/17/2019 at 9:30 AM (EDT)

    ​Systems automation consumes digital data. Without reliable known data automation systems are inherently unstable. The problem is compounded when users do not own or control the measurements systems, as is required for interoperability. It is therefore important to understand the quality and reliability of the measurement systems being used in drilling automation, and to take steps to ensure that measurement systems are transparent. This webinar will explore significant work in this area, based on published SPE papers.

    Systems automation consumes digital data. Without reliable known data automation systems are inherently unstable. The problem is compounded when users do not own or control the measurements systems, as is required for interoperability. It is therefore important to understand the quality and reliability of the measurement systems being used in drilling automation, and to take steps to ensure that measurement systems are transparent. This webinar will explore significant work in this area, based on published SPE papers.

    This first topic is based on SPE 174874 “A Framework for Transparency in Drilling Mechanics and Dynamics Measurements”, which examines the current confusion that exists in drilling mechanics and dynamics measurements. It recommends measurement practices and good processing techniques of these measurements, with examples, and presents a recommended open measurement framework. Adoption of this framework will resolve the current state of confusion and uncertainty, enable all parties to develop monitoring, advising and control applications that use these data, and help lower well costs and improve borehole quality.

    The second topic is based on SPE 189626 “ Operator’s Group, Rig Contractors, and OEM/Service Company Work to Solve Rig data Quality Issues”, which looks at quality issues with rig measurement systems, proposing quality practices among data providers and consumers. Widely adopted practices will support and drive requirements for sensor quality, calibration, field verification and maintenance. This standardization enables improved drilling operations, automation, data analysis and big data processing.

    The final topic will explore SPE 194082 “Creating Open Source Models, Test Cases, and Data for Oilfield Drilling Challenges” which proposes creating an open source repository of models, source code and data. The intent is to encourage the reuse of continuously improving models and coding efforts, and good data sets for verifying and validating the models. An open source repository for drilling will speed up the rate of learning and automation development.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by John Macpherson, Paul Pastusek, Michael Behounek and Richard Harmer and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from John Macpherson, Paul Pastusek, Michael Behounek and Richard Harmer.

    John Macpherson

    Chief Consulting Scientist, Drilling Services, Baker Hughes, a GE Company

    During his more than 40 years in the oil industry John has participated in exploratory drilling operations -- primarily in remote areas of South Amercia -- and in various positions in drilling research. His focus has been on exploration and drilling: starting with geology, through geomechanics, drilling modeling, to drilling dynamics and drilling systems automation. He has published about 40 papers, holds more than 30 granted patents, is a past Chairman of the SPE DSATS, and a member of the JPT editorial committee.

    Paul Pastusek

    Drilling Mechanics Advisor, Wells Technical Organization, ExxonMobil Upstream Integrated Solutions

    Paul has 41 years of experience working on drilling mechanics issues. His areas of expertise are: automation, drill string dynamics, steerable systems, borehole quality, bit applications, cutting mechanics, rig instrumentation and control systems, and failure analysis. Paul has a BSME from Texas A&M University and a MBA from the University of Houston. He is a Registered Professional Engineer, holds 39 US patents and has written 25 papers on drilling technology. 

    Michael Behounek

    Head of Drilling and Completions, Apache Corporation

    Michael leads a team of experts who support global operations and pursues technology advancement to drive improvement, increase value to Apache. He is a degreed Mechanical Engineer from University of Michigan with a Master’s in Business from Pepperdine. His 37 years of experience lies in drilling engineering, operations, performance improvement, and contracting. In technology, he has led numerous projects in drilling mechanics and dynamics, rig design and drilling automation. Current projects include an agnostic, edge drilling advisory system deployed to all of Apache rigs for the past three years.

    Richard Harmer

    Architect, Schlumberger’s Well Construction Platform

    Richard has been with Schlumberger for 19 years where he started his career as an MWD engineer, and has subsequently held positions as a; Drilling Domain Expert, Product Champion, and a Program Manager for land drilling rig development. Richard’s technical interests include drilling mechanics and dynamics, drilling interpretation and inference, and drilling automation. He has authored and/or co-authored more than 10 technical papers and holds 4 patents. He holds a Masters in Mechanical Engineering from Loughborough University in the UK.

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  • The Dream Well – Closing the Gap in Completions

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/12/2019

    Horizontals, Multi-zone, Openhole Packers, Barefoot, ICDs, ICVs, Frac Valves, Plug and Perf, Unconventional – Why are there so many lower completion types? There is a better way – all lower completions could be redesigned as a two-trip and intervention capable system.

    Horizontals, Multi-zone, Openhole Packers, Barefoot, ICDs, ICVs, Frac Valves, Plug and Perf, Unconventional – Why are there so many lower completion types? There is a better way – all lower completions could be redesigned as a two-trip and intervention capable system. Such systems could provide higher value and flexibility for unforeseen circumstances enabling future remediation. Scope changes could be made using OPEX adjustments rather than CAPEX investments. Sensor and  actuator reliability would increase as they become replaceable. Such a system could have permanent compartment packers and tubulars, but the flow control and flow sensing elements would be replaceable, upgradeable, and reconfigurable, optimizing the completion for the life of the well. The industry should create a single completions type that can be reconfigured “on demand” into all the types we presently use. The net result would be a hassle free, “Dream Well.”

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Brett Bouldin and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Brett Bouldin.

    Brett Bouldin

    Petroleum Engineering Consultant, Saudi Aramco

    Mr. Bouldin is a Petroleum Engineering Consultant with Saudi Aramco with 36 years of product development experience in the completions industry. His career started with Baker Hughes, then he became a founding member of WellDynamics, which is now a Halliburton company prior to his appointment at Saudi Aramco for the previous 9 years. Brett initiates and manages Saudi Aramco’s completions development projects focusing on new tool deployments that would improve production recovery. He has authored 12 technical papers and articles with 38 granted US patents. Brett holds a BS degree in Industrial Engineering from Texas A&M University and is a Registered Professional Engineer in Texas and Saudi Arabia.

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  • Drilling Uncertainty – What Does the Drilling Fluid Have To Do With It?

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/10/2019

    Critical drilling issues are usually associated with convergence of pore and fracture pressure, and are intimately connected to the downhole behavior of drilling fluids and uncertainties associated with predicting their behavior during well construction. This presentation will highlight how drilling fluids affect uncertainties in pressure estimates and present strategies to quantify and overcome deficiencies.

    Critical drilling issues are usually associated with convergence of pore and fracture pressure, and are intimately connected to the downhole behavior of drilling fluids and uncertainties associated with predicting their behavior during well construction. Top areas of operational concerns, such as lost circulation, hole-cleaning, barite sag, wellbore stability, stuck pipe, etc. all share a common thread in hydraulics, and continue to plague drilling operations and efficiencies. From shallow sections to well completions, the drilling fluid and its imposed pressures represent the primary barrier for well control, and fluid hydraulics affects every stage of well construction.

    Current measurements provide at best a partial view of downhole pressure windows, and software technologies are necessary to fill in the gaps. A classic example includes optimum speeds for running casing where no downhole measurements currently exist. While the consequences of hydraulics-related problems are well documented, deeper understanding of downhole drilling fluid behavior is plagued by difficult to model dynamic conditions and transient operations. Uncertainties in predicting or simulating drilling fluid behavior impact monitoring and optimizing drilling performance. This presentation will highlight how drilling fluids affect uncertainties in pressure estimates and present strategies to quantify and overcome deficiencies.

    Dr. Sanjit Roy

    Global Engineering Applications Director, QMAX Solutions

    Dr. Roy has spent more than 25 years in the areas of drilling fluid research and technology development, specifically in hydraulics, rheology, and real-time analysis of drilling and drilling fluids performance and related areas. He has managed and also developed software to model drilling fluid behavior and drilling processes. He has made many SPE and AADE workshop presentations, and facilitated SPE forums on drilling fluid modeling, hydraulics, ECD management and real-time processes. He has more than 40 industry publications and is a member of SPE and AADE.

    Dr. Roy has a B. Tech. in Mining Engineering from IIT Kharagpur, and MS and Ph.D. in Petroleum Engineering from University of California, Berkeley.

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  • Enabling Safer Offshore Energy Operations: Current Advances in Safety and Risk Assessment

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/10/2019

    Investigation of past incidents always reveal deficiencies that are not directly equipment-related, but may be non-technical in nature, such as procedural deviation, inadequate communication etc. Past risk assessment models only provide semi-quantitative approaches to incorporate them in the risk assessment and cannot capture their dynamic nature and dependency in a single model. Current research takes up the challenge of developing a framework and step-by-step methodology for quantitatively merging technical, operational, human and organizational factors contributing to the cumulative risk of a barrier failure. It also addresses their dynamic changes with time, considers their interactions with each other and incorporates the uncertainty of parameter estimation to assess the cumulative risk in a facility.

    Investigation of past incidents always reveal deficiencies that are not directly equipment-related, but may be non-technical in nature, such as procedural deviation, inadequate communication etc. Past risk assessment models only provide semi-quantitative approaches to incorporate them in the risk assessment and cannot capture their dynamic nature and dependency in a single model. Current research takes up the challenge of developing a framework and step-by-step methodology for quantitatively merging technical, operational, human and organizational factors contributing to the cumulative risk of a barrier failure. It also addresses their dynamic changes with time, considers their interactions with each other and incorporates the uncertainty of parameter estimation to assess the cumulative risk in a facility.

    Syeda Zohra Halim

    MSc, PhD Candidate

    Syeda Zohra Halim completed her PhD in Chemical Engineering in Spring 2019 with Mary Kay O’Connor Process Safety Center at Texas A&M University.  Her research focused on developing a model for assessing cumulative risk arising from impaired barriers in offshore oil and gas facilities. In her work, she identified and analyzed organizational issues that contribute to increased risk and utilized Hierarchical Bayesian Analysis to show how such contributors can be quantified and brought together with technical factors to understand their dynamic holistic effect on risk.

    A keen supporter of promoting process safety, Zohra has actively been involved in multiple process safety related projects alongside her research work. Such projects include developing a PSM implementation plan for an international industrial corporation, analyzing BSEE incident investigation databases to determine leading causes behind incidents in offshore oil and gas facilities, developing process safety course materials for an international university, working in collaboration with IChemE to develop a roadmap for process safety for the 21st century and writing a book chapter on process safety for petroleum engineering students. She also works as a team member with the Ocean Energy Safety Institute (OESI) and volunteers frequently in their forums and workshops. Zohra has won the Texas Sea Grant Special Award, Lamiya Zahin Memorial Safety Scholarship and has held first position thrice at the Annual MKOPSC Poster Competition. She was elected Media Chair of the Chemical Engineering Graduate Students’ Association (ChEGSA).

    Before coming to Texas A&M University, Zohra completed her B.Sc. and M.Sc. in Chemical Engineering from Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (BUET). 

    James Pettigrew

    Principal Investigator and Director of Operations, Ocean Energy Safety Institute

    Retired Navy Captain Jim Pettigrew is the Principal Investigator and Director of Operations for the Ocean Energy Safety Institute (OESI). A partnership between Texas A&M University, University of Houston, and University of Texas – Austin; OESI provides a forum for dialogue, shared learning and cooperative research among academia, government, industry and other non-governmental organizations. OESI’s focus is offshore-related technologies and activities that help ensure safer and environmentally responsible offshore operations. Jim assumed the position of Director in May 2014, and Principal Investigator in December 2018.

    Throughout his three decades in the Navy, Pettigrew worked predominantly in operational oceanography, surface warfare and information warfare; managing and mitigating risk at all levels of operations. He served most recently as Chief of Staff for the Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command where he was responsible for the direction and leadership of a team of 150 people, executing a $300 million annual budget, the operations of 4,000 personnel worldwide, the nation's Master Clock, two world-class supercomputing facilities, and six military Oceanographic Survey Ships. He also had the privilege and honor of serving as the Commanding Officer for the Navy’s Global Atmospheric and Ocean Modeling Supercomputing Center (Fleet Numerical, in Monterey, CA) and as the Commanding Officer for the Navy’s only forward deployed Operational Oceanography support center in Yokosuka, Japan. He served twice in the Pentagon and was Joint-qualified serving with the U.S. Space Command in Colorado Springs.

    Pettigrew received his Masters of Science in Physical Oceanography and Meteorology from the Naval Postgraduate School, and received his Bachelors of Science in Ocean Engineering from Texas A&M University.

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  • Carbon Storage in the Mt. Simon: Field Examples of Regional Deployment

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/06/2019

    The development of commercial-scale projects has been a strategic process across multiple phases leading to a succession of projects of increasing scale in the Central United States. Four major carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects in Decatur, Illinois and Terra Haute, Indiana exemplify the strategic pathway defined more than a decade ago by the U.S. Department of Energy – National Technology Laboratory (US DOE).

    The development of commercial-scale projects has been a strategic process across multiple phases leading to a succession of projects of increasing scale in the Central United States. Four major carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects in Decatur, Illinois and Terra Haute, Indiana exemplify the strategic pathway defined more than a decade ago by the U.S. Department of Energy – National Technology Laboratory (US DOE). Since 2003, the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), a US DOE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, has been working to define regional CCS potential, conducting small enhanced oil and enhanced coalbed methane projects, and conducting a large-scale deep saline CCS storage project. As a direct outcome of the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP), a one million tonne storage demonstration, the Illinois Industrial Sources CCUS Project (ICCS) has expanded infrastructure and injection potential to industrial commercial-scale CCUS. Advancing CCUS even further, the CarbonSAFE Macon County and Wabash CarbonSAFE projects seek to conduct characterization leading to the development of a 50 million tonne storage complexes with the potential to receive and store CO2 from multiple sources. These projects combined provide an excellent example of how leveraging research, resources, relationships, and experience can drive CCUS toward commercialization.

    Dr. Sallie Greenberg

    Associate Director of Energy and Minerals, Illinois State Geological Survey

    Dr. Greenberg is the principal investigator for the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of the U.S. Department of Energy’s seven regional sequestration partnerships and the founder of the Sequestration Training and Education Program (STEP). In these roles, Dr. Greenberg collaborates with teams of scientists, engineers, and policy makers working on several carbon capture and geologic storage projects, including the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project, CarbonSAFE Illinois, Wabash CarbonSAFE, and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Projects. Over the last 15 years, she has consulted or contributed to more than 30 carbon capture and storage projects, especially in the areas of project development, risk reduction, and stakeholder engagement.

    Dr. Greenberg’s combination of advanced degrees in low temperature geochemistry and education provide a unique perspective on understanding public challenges related to balancing societal demands for energy with environmental concern. She currently is a Prairie Research Institute Science Fellow. Dr. Greenberg holds a Ph.D. in Secondary and Continuing Education and Master of Science degree in Geology from the University of Illinois, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Geology from Alfred University in New York.

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