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  • Drilling Uncertainty – What Does the Drilling Fluid Have To Do With It?

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 09/10/2019 at 9:30 AM (EDT)

    Critical drilling issues are usually associated with convergence of pore and fracture pressure, and are intimately connected to the downhole behavior of drilling fluids and uncertainties associated with predicting their behavior during well construction. This presentation will highlight how drilling fluids affect uncertainties in pressure estimates and present strategies to quantify and overcome deficiencies.

    Critical drilling issues are usually associated with convergence of pore and fracture pressure, and are intimately connected to the downhole behavior of drilling fluids and uncertainties associated with predicting their behavior during well construction. Top areas of operational concerns, such as lost circulation, hole-cleaning, barite sag, wellbore stability, stuck pipe, etc. all share a common thread in hydraulics, and continue to plague drilling operations and efficiencies. From shallow sections to well completions, the drilling fluid and its imposed pressures represent the primary barrier for well control, and fluid hydraulics affects every stage of well construction.

    Current measurements provide at best a partial view of downhole pressure windows, and software technologies are necessary to fill in the gaps. A classic example includes optimum speeds for running casing where no downhole measurements currently exist. While the consequences of hydraulics-related problems are well documented, deeper understanding of downhole drilling fluid behavior is plagued by difficult to model dynamic conditions and transient operations. Uncertainties in predicting or simulating drilling fluid behavior impact monitoring and optimizing drilling performance. This presentation will highlight how drilling fluids affect uncertainties in pressure estimates and present strategies to quantify and overcome deficiencies.

    Dr. Sanjit Roy

    Global Engineering Applications Director, QMAX Solutions

    Dr. Roy has spent more than 25 years in the areas of drilling fluid research and technology development, specifically in hydraulics, rheology, and real-time analysis of drilling and drilling fluids performance and related areas. He has managed and also developed software to model drilling fluid behavior and drilling processes. He has made many SPE and AADE workshop presentations, and facilitated SPE forums on drilling fluid modeling, hydraulics, ECD management and real-time processes. He has more than 40 industry publications and is a member of SPE and AADE.

    Dr. Roy has a B. Tech. in Mining Engineering from IIT Kharagpur, and MS and Ph.D. in Petroleum Engineering from University of California, Berkeley.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Carbon Storage in the Mt. Simon: Field Examples of Regional Deployment

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 09/06/2019 at 9:30 AM (EDT)

    The development of commercial-scale projects has been a strategic process across multiple phases leading to a succession of projects of increasing scale in the Central United States. Four major carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects in Decatur, Illinois and Terra Haute, Indiana exemplify the strategic pathway defined more than a decade ago by the U.S. Department of Energy – National Technology Laboratory (US DOE).

    The development of commercial-scale projects has been a strategic process across multiple phases leading to a succession of projects of increasing scale in the Central United States. Four major carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects in Decatur, Illinois and Terra Haute, Indiana exemplify the strategic pathway defined more than a decade ago by the U.S. Department of Energy – National Technology Laboratory (US DOE). Since 2003, the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), a US DOE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, has been working to define regional CCS potential, conducting small enhanced oil and enhanced coalbed methane projects, and conducting a large-scale deep saline CCS storage project. As a direct outcome of the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP), a one million tonne storage demonstration, the Illinois Industrial Sources CCUS Project (ICCS) has expanded infrastructure and injection potential to industrial commercial-scale CCUS. Advancing CCUS even further, the CarbonSAFE Macon County and Wabash CarbonSAFE projects seek to conduct characterization leading to the development of a 50 million tonne storage complexes with the potential to receive and store CO2 from multiple sources. These projects combined provide an excellent example of how leveraging research, resources, relationships, and experience can drive CCUS toward commercialization.

    Dr. Sallie Greenberg

    Associate Director of Energy and Minerals, Illinois State Geological Survey

    Dr. Greenberg is the principal investigator for the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of the U.S. Department of Energy’s seven regional sequestration partnerships and the founder of the Sequestration Training and Education Program (STEP). In these roles, Dr. Greenberg collaborates with teams of scientists, engineers, and policy makers working on several carbon capture and geologic storage projects, including the Illinois Basin – Decatur Project, CarbonSAFE Illinois, Wabash CarbonSAFE, and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage Projects. Over the last 15 years, she has consulted or contributed to more than 30 carbon capture and storage projects, especially in the areas of project development, risk reduction, and stakeholder engagement.

    Dr. Greenberg’s combination of advanced degrees in low temperature geochemistry and education provide a unique perspective on understanding public challenges related to balancing societal demands for energy with environmental concern. She currently is a Prairie Research Institute Science Fellow. Dr. Greenberg holds a Ph.D. in Secondary and Continuing Education and Master of Science degree in Geology from the University of Illinois, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Geology from Alfred University in New York.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Life Cycle Water Management: Internal and External Strategies

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 09/05/2019 at 11:00 AM (EDT)

    This presentation covers the life cycle issues around water management for the upstream industry, with a focus on tools, strategies and ideas on how to reduce risk, cost and liability.

    Water is an essential aspect of oil and natural gas operations.  Water sourcing, transportation, storage, use, discharge, and disposal continue to be issues that companies are working on to reduce associated risk, cost and liability.  Ms. Cooper will talk about the life cycle issues around water management for the upstream industry, with a focus on tools, strategies and ideas on how to reduce risk, cost and liability.  In addition, she will focus on how to better share information around a company’s water strategy for internal and external purposes.  This means sharing ideas on how to best engage internal stakeholders and address questions and concerns of external stakeholders.

    Jill Cooper

    Senior Principal at Geosyntec Consultants, Recent Chair of the Energy Water Initiative, Contributor of Water Collaboratory Advisory Group

    Ms. Cooper has over 25-years of environmental and sustainability experience in government, industry and a law firm. Her focus is on sustainability, EHS, water management, audits and due diligence, management systems, compliance, regulatory affairs, and stakeholder engagement. Her experience with water and the oil and natural gas industry is diverse and extensive. When working in-house at oil and gas companies, she oversaw their environmental water teams and was involved in regulatory permitting, compliance, life-cycle water management, water data and reporting systems, and risk evaluations at the regional and corporate level.

    Her produced water experience includes water sourcing, transport, storage, usage, disposal and treatment for release to the surface or reuse. Until recently, she was the chair of the Energy Water Initiative – a group of 23 upstream oil and gas companies that discuss and work together on life-cycle water strategies. She is also regularly asked to speak on the topic of produced and life-cycle water management for the industry by: government, research institutions, trade associations, and others. Recently, she was asked to serve on the Water Collaboratory Advisory Group (Colorado universities’ joint research facility).

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Using Well Heterogeneity as an Advantage to Designing Stage Specific Diverter Strategies

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/19/2019

    This talk will discuss a methodology that examines well heterogeneity, and designs the diversion strategy based on the rock properties within each fracturing stage. In addition to rock properties, the method proposed utilizes stress shadows, perforation design, and modified pump schedules to ensure equal cluster stimulation in diverter applications.

    When hydraulically fracturing a horizontal wellbore with multiple perforation clusters, the fluid being pumped into the reservoir will preferentially take the path of least resistance. Perforations that are located in the lowest stressed rocks will take a larger amount of fluid, and those perforations located in highest stressed rocks will receive less, or in some cases none. One of the ways that engineers are trying to overcome these differences is the use of diverters. A fluid diverter is typically inserted at some point within a hydraulic fracturing pump schedule to seal off dominant fractures, allowing fluid to flow into under-stimulated fractures. 

    The problem with this methodology is that without reservoir knowledge, operators rely on rules of thumb developed through trial and error to determine when and how much diverter to use. Data has shown how this methodology can be ineffective, leaving some clusters over stimulated and others under-stimulated. Anecdotal evidence also supports these concerns  because equally sized diverter slugs do not always have equal pressure response.This talk will discuss a methodology that examines well heterogeneity, and designs the diversion strategy based on the rock properties within each fracturing stage. In addition to rock properties, the method proposed utilizes stress shadows, perforation design, and modified pump schedules to ensure equal cluster stimulation in diverter applications.

    The result of this workflow is a tool that has been used to maximize the effectiveness of diverters which has shown, through several case studies that will be discussed, to result in better producing wells at lower completions cost.

    Kevin Wutherich

    Chief Technology Officer, Drill2Frac

    Kevin has 20 years of industry experience both with an operator and in the service industry. Before joining Drill2Frac as the Chief Technology Officer, where he has worked for the last 2 years, he was the Director of Completions at Rice Energy where he led a team of engineers in creating the top performing wells in the region. Before that he held multiple positions including Stimulation Domain Expert over a fifteen-year career at Schlumberger. He is the lead inventor on seven patents related to fracturing procedures and tools, and has authored many SPE papers and contributed to several industry publications primarily focused on shale completions. Kevin has also been honored with multiple industry awards, most recently for his creation and development of  ”Engineered Diversion Strategies”, which was selected as the World Oil Awards “2018 Best Completion Technology”. Kevin received a Bachelor’s degree in Chemical Engineering from the University of Waterloo in Canada.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Preparing the Next Generation Workforce for the Digital Transformation of the Oil and Gas Industry – Interview with Leslie Malone

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 08/14/2019

    Tune in to this 30-minute interview to gain insight into this industry expert’s personal views and professional experiences on how leadership challenges are similar yet different, in the world of digital transformation.

    Preparing the next generation workforce for the digital transformation of the Oil & Gas Industry is a critical task. The Big Crew Change of professionals hired in the 1970s and 1980s is largely over with and a new generation is taking their place. Beyond the obvious changes in technology, what other skills will the new petroleum engineer need and what new challenges will they face in the digital oilfield 2.0?

    Tune in to this 30-minute interview to gain insight into this industry expert’s personal views and professional experiences on how leadership challenges are similar yet different, in the world of digital transformation. 

    Interview with: Ms. Leslie Malone

    Interviewed by: Marise Mikulis, Chief Transformation Office at EnergyInnova, Inc.

    Ms. Leslie Malone

    Speaker

    Ms. Malone graduated with a BS in Petroleum Engineering from Texas Tech University and began her career with ARCO Oil and Gas as a facilities/operation engineer in Hobbs, NM and Midland, Texas.

    Leslie took a break from the oil and gas industry to raise a family; re-entering the industry as a production/ operation engineer with Vernon E. Faulconer, Inc. in Tyler, TX ; then Sr. Staff Engineer with Murphy Exploration in Houston and Area Production Manager with Sanchez Oil and Gas Corporation.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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    Members : Free!

    Non-members : USD 50.00

  • 21st Century Ocean Energy Safety Research Roadmap

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/23/2019

    ​A research roadmap, based on data and input from experts across the offshore oil and gas industries, was developed to help prioritize R&D investments to improve offshore health, safety, environmental performance. The final report focuses on the Gulf of Mexico, while incorporating applicable findings and research from all offshore regions where oil and gas is produced.

    A research roadmap, based on data and input from experts across the offshore oil and gas industries, was developed to help prioritize R&D investments to improve offshore health, safety, environmental performance. The final report focuses on the Gulf of Mexico, while incorporating applicable findings and research from all offshore regions where oil and gas is produced. 

    The roadmap report is comprehensive, utilizing publications, subject matter experts, documents from the Offshore Energy Safety Institute (OESI) including “Ocean Energy Safety Research Roadmap for the 21st Century Forum for Dialogue” and the “Portfolio of Ocean Energy Safety Research Efforts.” Other documents include the 2018 The Research Partnership for a Secure Energy America (RPSEA) “R&D Plan”, a 2018 Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE) and Gulf Research Program (GRP) ‘Safer Offshore Energy System Summit.’;  in addition, the report utilizes SPE, SEG and IADC papers, and published summaries from other safety workshops and meetings. The SME’s submitted recommendations concerning broad topics, with several sub topics including; Drilling, Operations, Production, Transportation and Spills. The report recommendations include the need, value and, in some cases estimated level of effort for different safety areas. Areas covered include prevention, response and mitigation as well as needed advancements in information systems, internet security, data sharing, prediction and early detection.

    The Technology Road Map, developed in this effort, offers a unique opportunity to guide the applications of advanced technologies.  These new technology applications will continue the significant progress of current safety and environmental management systems and procedures. The Safety Research Roadmap, developed in cooperation with regulators, service providers and researchers, addresses an important need to identify and prioritize limited research investments. This report provides opportunities for cooperation and leveraging of funding and resources.

    Jim Pettigrew

    Principal Investigator/Director of Operations, Ocean Energy Safety Institute

    Retired Navy Captain Jim Pettigrew is the Principal Investigator and Director of Operations for the Ocean Energy Safety Institute (OESI). A partnership between Texas A&M University, University of Houston, and University of Texas – Austin; OESI provides a forum for dialogue, shared learning and cooperative research among academia, government, industry and other non-governmental organizations. OESI’s focus is offshore-related technologies and activities that help ensure safer and environmentally responsible offshore operations. Jim assumed the position of Principal Investigator in December 2018, and Director in May 2014.

    Throughout his three decades in the Navy, Pettigrew worked predominantly in operational oceanography, surface warfare and information warfare; managing and mitigating risk at all levels of operations. He served most recently as Chief of Staff for the Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command where he was responsible for the direction and leadership of a team of 150 people, executing a $300 million annual budget, the operations of 4,000 personnel worldwide, the nation's Master Clock, two world-class supercomputing facilities, and six military Oceanographic Survey Ships. He also had the privilege and honor of serving as the Commanding Officer for the Navy’s Global Atmospheric and Ocean Modeling Supercomputing Center (Fleet Numerical, in Monterey, CA) and as the Commanding Officer for the Navy’s only forward deployed Operational Oceanography support center in Yokosuka, Japan. He served twice in the Pentagon and was Joint-qualified serving with the U.S. Space Command in Colorado Springs.

    Pettigrew received his Masters of Science in Physical Oceanography and Meteorology from the Naval Postgraduate School, and received his Bachelors of Science in Ocean Engineering from Texas A&M University. 

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Capturing our Geomechanics Legacy to Understand Its Future -- Interview with Dr. Maurice Dusseault

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 07/19/2019

    Tune in to this 30-minute interview to gain insight into this industry expert’s personal views and professional experiences on why they chose to focus on the Geomechanics field; what it was like when they began working in it; its evolution and where they see Geomechanics going in the future.

    This series of industry interviews will focus on understanding and capturing the historical legacy of petroleum geomechanics from the experts who created it. From this historical foundation, these same experts with consider the future path, focus and value of petroleum geomechanics.

    Tune in to this 30-minute interview to gain insight into this industry expert’s personal views and professional experiences on why they chose to focus on the Geomechanics field; what it was like when they began working in it; its evolution and where they see Geomechanics going in the future. 

    Interview with: Dr. Maurice Dusseault, Professor of Geological Engineering, Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Canada

    Interviewed by: Neal B. Nagel, PhD – Chief Engineer and Principal, Oilfield Geomechanics LLC; Chair, SPE Geomechanics Technical Section (GTS)

    Dr. Maurice B. Dusseault

    Earth and Environmental Sciences Dept., University of Waterloo

    Dr. Dusseault is a Professional Engineer and teaches Geological Engineering at the University of Waterloo. He carries out research in deep underground engineering issues including oil production, hydraulic fracturing, energy storage, geothermal energy, carbon sequestration, and deep injection disposal of granular solids and liquid wastes (including biosolids, oilfield wastes, and civil wastes). He holds over 90 international patents, has about 570 full-text papers published in journals and conferences and has taught Petroleum Geomechanics short courses in 28 countries. He is involved in energy technologies that can be downscaled to community levels to provide robust and reliable heat and power: geothermal, natural gas approaches, compressed air energy storage, and heat geo-storage. Many of the general energy processes he works on involve hydraulic fracture implementation to generate communication, or analysis to prevent hydraulic fracturing onset.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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    Members : Free!

    Non-members : USD 50.00

  • Produced Water Treatment and Reuse – A Global Perspective

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/17/2019

    This Webinar will compare and contrast the different types of produced water and the different ways in which produced water is handled in various regions around the globe. The objective is to demonstrate how different factors, which vary from one region to another, such as hydrocarbon development, produced water type, regulations, water scarcity, and water volumes result in dramatically different strategies for disposing and/or reusing produced water.

    This Webinar will compare and contrast the different types of produced water and the different ways in which produced water is handled in various regions around the globe. The objective is to demonstrate how different factors, which vary from one region to another, such as hydrocarbon development, produced water type, regulations, water scarcity, and water volumes result in dramatically different strategies for disposing and/or reusing produced water.

    Differences in produced water handling from one region to another are explained in both practical terms mentioned above, and in terms of the fundamental science and engineering of water treatment. Fundamental factors such as the chemistry of the oil and water, treatment chemistries, fluid mechanics of processing systems, particle size distributions, and different types of emulsions are brought to life. Real-world examples are laid out, and explained both in practical terms and in terms of the fundamentals. The material is presented from an independent, technology neutral view point. The Webinar will wrap up with a discussion of where the industry is likely to go in the next five or ten years in terms of reducing cost and water footprint.

    John Walsh

    Principal Technologist, Worley

    Dr. Walsh has worked as a water specialist for over thirty-five years. He is currently a Principal Technologist for Worley. Before Worley, he was the Global Water Treatment Subject Matter Expert for Royal Dutch Shell. He has worked on projects in fourteen countries and was involved in essentially all aspects of water treatment in upstream oil and gas. He started his career as a water treatment engineer with Westvaco Paper Company.

    Until recently he was the President and Managing Director of the Produced Water Society, an international organization of upstream water treatment specialists. He remains on their Board of Directors. He has served on the Board of Directors of Society of Petroleum Engineers. He is the designated instructor for the SPE water treatment courses. He has recently authored a two-volume book which can be found on Amazon by searching “Produced Water Walsh.” He earned a PhD in Chemical Engineering from the Johns Hopkins University.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Rig Security in the IOT World

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/10/2019

    A growing trend in our industry is to move from back-office (and potentially isolated) processing to data fed analysis and decision making at the edge were the drilling bit meets the geology. To accomplish this level of integration and data-centric automation, analytical engines have an insatiable hunger for data! With traditional workflows this data would reside in a corporate data store protected by physical and logical barriers to secure and protect it as a corporate asset. In this new world of edge-based analytics, we need to balance this thirst for data with the need for protection of the data asset and security from digital threats. In this webinar we will discuss several technics for connecting, converting and standardizing data for analytical use and also protecting the corporate network including considering physical and network barriers like an air gap to isolate the rig while still allowing for authorized interactivity.

    A growing trend in our industry is to move from back-office (and potentially isolated) processing to data fed analysis and decision making at the edge were the drilling bit meets the geology. 

    To accomplish this level of integration and data-centric automation, analytical engines have an insatiable hunger for data!  With traditional workflows this data would reside in a corporate data store protected by physical and logical barriers to secure and protect it as a corporate asset.

    In this new world of edge-based analytics, we need to balance this thirst for data with the need for protection of the data asset and security from digital threats.

    In this webinar we will discuss several technics for connecting, converting and standardizing data for analytical use and also protecting the corporate network including considering physical and network barriers like an air gap to isolate the rig while still allowing for authorized interactivity.

    Jon Curtis

    Chairman Emeritus, Petrolink International Limited and Vice President of Saudi Arabia, Petrolink

    Jon Curtis is a member of numerous professional organizations and is the former Chair of SPE’s Drilling Uncertainty Prediction Technical Section (DUPTS) and the current Technical Section Liaison, where he works with other leaders to provide comprehensive solutions across drilling operations. Mr. Curtis is author of multiple SPE papers including those concerning data architecture of real-time drilling and completions information and the integration of real-time, drilling sensor data with drilling reporting data. He graduated from Oxford University where he studied Metallurgy and Materials Science.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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  • Performance of a Highly Hydrophobic Coating for Solids Management in Production Systems

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/27/2019

    ​Deposition of inorganic and organic solids in production systems compromises throughput and can cause other operational and safety issues. Once formed, remediation of deposits is costly, often resulting in lost production. In this presentation, we evaluate the performance of a highly hydrophobic diamond like carbon (DLC) coating on deposition of common production system solids.

    Deposition of inorganic and organic solids in production systems compromises throughput and can cause other operational and safety issues. Once formed, remediation of deposits is costly, often resulting in lost production. Solids management strategies typically involve a combination of chemical injection, thermal management and periodic chemical or mechanical remediation operations specific for each depositing species. Internal coatings offer another potential approach to solids management. In this presentation, we evaluate the performance of a highly hydrophobic diamond like carbon (DLC) coating on deposition of common production system solids. The coating is a 200-nanometer thick functionalized amorphous DLC coating that is molecularly bonded to the substrate through a plasma deposition process. The impact of the coating on deposit formation and adhesion is investigated through use of bench scale, pilot scale and field scale experiments for wax, asphaltene, inorganic scales and hydrates. Based on the positive results of the performance testing, a commercial-scale application facility has been designed, constructed and in commercial operation.

    Dr. John Ratulowski

    Reservoir Fluids and Flow Assurance Consultant

    Dr. Ratulowski received his B.Sc. degree in Chemical Engineering from Purdue University and his PhD also in Chemical Engineering from the University of Houston. He has worked for 16 years in the reservoir and facilities engineering departments of the Bellaire and Westhollow Shell Technology Laboratories in Houston. During this time John was involved in thermal recovery projects, equation of state development, physical property and phase behavior measurement and organic solids measurement and modelling. In 1999, John assumed the role of Vice President – Research for DB Robinson After the acquisition of DBR by Schlumberger in 2001, John acted as Reservoir Fluids Research Director at Schlumberger’s DBR technology center in Edmonton Alberta Canada and Reservoir Geosciences Research Director at Schlumberger Dow Research Center in Cambridge Massachusetts until his retirement in 2017. John is currently an independent consultant in the areas of reservoir fluids and flow assurance.

    SPE Webinars are FREE to members courtesy of the

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