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  • The National Petroleum Council Roadmap to At-Scale Deployment of Carbon Capture, Use, and Storage in the United States

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 01/29/2020 at 11:30 AM (EST)

    The United States leads the world in CCUS deployment today with approximately 80% of the world’s carbon dioxide (CO2) capture capacity, with many of the early projects driven by market economics, including the availability of low-cost supply of CO2 and demand for CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Moreover, although the United States is currently the world leader, its 25 million tonnes of CCUS capacity represents less than 1% of the CO2 emissions from stationary sources.

    The United States leads the world in CCUS deployment today with approximately 80% of the world’s carbon dioxide (CO2) capture capacity, with many of the early projects driven by market economics, including the availability of low-cost supply of CO2 and demand for CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Moreover, although the United States is currently the world leader, its 25 million tonnes of CCUS capacity represents less than 1% of the CO2 emissions from stationary sources. 

    As the US explores options to promote economic growth and ensure energy security while protecting the environment by reducing carbon dioxide emissions over time; the U.S. Secretary of Energy requested the National Petroleum Council (NPC) to undertake and deliver a comprehensive study that would define potential pathways for deploying and integrating CCUS technologies at scale, into the energy and industrial marketplace in the United States, with an emphasis on the petroleum industry.  

    The United States has more than 6,500 large stationary sources emitting approximately 2.6 billion tonnes of CO2 per year across multiple industries. Many of these sources are located near geologic formations suitable for CO2 storage, providing opportunities to expand deployment of CCUS and extend the U.S. leadership position. 

    Large-scale CCUS technologies require significant investments and infrastructure, as well as the cooperation of multiple industries.  The oil and natural gas industry has unique capabilities to contribute to CCUS at the scale required, including the handling of large volumes of gas and liquids, deploying world-scale equipment, evaluating the subsurface for safe storage capacity, monitoring the integrity of storage, constructing pipeline infrastructure, and managing the construction and operation of large capital-intensive projects. 

    Accordingly, the report addresses the entire CCUS supply chain from capture through use and/or storage.  It understands that the success of CCUS at scale requires economic and operational integration across industries, harmonized local/state/federal regulations, and broad public acceptance.  The report addresses the technology advances and choices needed; infrastructure requirements, economics, cross-sector integration, regulation, policy options, and public acceptance.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Nigel Jenvey and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Nigel Jenvey.

    Nigel Jenvey

    Industry Leader, Carbon Management and Carbon Capture

    Nigel has over 24 years of global oil and gas industry experience in technology, exploration, development and production operations with major oil and gas operating companies. He is an industry leader in Carbon Management and expert in Carbon Capture, Use and Storage (CCUS) having previously held roles such as the chair of the CO2 Capture Project, chair of the North American CCS Association, and program chair of the Society of Petroleum Engineers CCUS Technical Section.

    For the National Petroleum Council CCUS Study he was alternate chair for the Coordinating Subcommittee, lead for the Roadmap to Deployment Team and co-author of the Supply Chain and Economics chapter.   At Gaffney, Cline & Associates, Nigel leads the global Carbon Management practice to help customers understand the wide variety of options available that will ensure continued business success through the energy transition.

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  • Nanomaterials in Upstream Oil and Gas Technologies – Review & Latest Advances

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/22/2020

    This webinar provides a brief overview of the applications of nanoparticles as they relate to upstream oil and gas and evaluates where the current state-of-the-art is in high performance oil well construction, production enhancement and reservoir management materials.

    Research in nanomaterials has brought many performance enhancements to the materials used in oil and gas well drilling, cementing, production and enhanced oil recovery. While the products of these investigations and product development processes vary widely in terms of technology readiness, improvements in performances with nanoparticles are being witnessed in the field at this current time. Step-change innovation in the industry through advances in nanomaterials is anticipated to find a strong footing in the development of smart self-sensing cements, production technologies, enhanced oil-recovery technologies, nanoparticle sensors, sensor networks, and downhole power and automation. This webinar provides a brief overview of the applications of nanoparticles as they relate to upstream oil and gas and evaluates where the current state-of-the-art is in high performance oil well construction, production enhancement and reservoir management materials.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. Peter Boul and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. Peter Boul.

    Dr. Peter Boul

    Senior Research Scientist, Saudi Aramco Research Center

    Dr. Boul is Senior Research Scientist at Saudi Aramco Research Center in Houston where he is currently their cement focal point leader. Previously he has worked as scientist at Halliburton and NASA. He has the unique distinction of doing his PhD in nanochemistry with Prof Smalley at Rice University and post-doctoral work with Professor Jean-Marie Lehn at UNIVERSITÉ LOUIS PASTEUR, Strasbourg, France, both Noble laureates.

    Dr. Boul was involved in invention of a new class of non-classical dynamic self-healing elastomers. He has been granted patents in nanotechnology and other areas and has published in Science and many other scholarly publications. Peter is very active in R&D industry groups in American Chemical Society (ACS) and Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE), where he serves and Program Vice-Chair of its R&D Technical Section. 

    Peter was an invited keynote speaker at Conference Oil & Gas Polymer Engineering Texas and ACS division of Polymer Chemistry’s Macromex and a member of the Cedric K. Ferguson Medal Subcommittee. He is the chair of 2020 ACS National Meeting Polymers’ Section Industrial Innovations.  

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  • Enhanced Production Through Surface Facilities Sand Management

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/21/2020

    Presented by Dr. Hank Rawlins

    All oil & gas wells produce sand – either a little or a lot! Conventional sand control, which includes production limits or completions, has two downsides:

         1.          neither method achieves maximum production

         2.          both methods fail at some point - allowing solids to overwhelm the surface facility

    Solids handling then becomes an expensive maintenance problem, HSE incident, or downtime production loss. What if the facility handled sand without interruption or equipment downtime? Even better, what if sand co-production improved recovery or restarted shut-in wells? Facilities Sand Management (FSM) skillfully handles solids to sustain production while minimizing the effects on operations.

    FSM methodology uses five discrete steps: Separation, Collection, Cleaning, Dewatering, and Transport. All steps must be followed, with a focus on the approach - not a piece of equipment. Separation removes sand and solids from the flow stream, while Collection gathers the solids into a central location and isolate them from the process. Cleaning, if required, removes associated oil and Dewatering removes associated liquids – both to simplify handling and minimize handling volume. Transport brings the solids to disposal location, which may be discharge, landfill, ship-to-shore, or injection. Each step is integral to simplify operations and extend equipment life, and all steps can be incorporated into new or existing facilities. Solids handling should not be viewed as a waste stream treatment problem – it is a critical flow assurance task. FSM provides a degree of skill to solids handling to sustain flow in surface operations and enhance production.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. Hank Rawlins and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. Hank Rawlins.

    Dr. Hank Rawlins

    Technical Director, eProcess Technologies

    Dr. Rawlins has 25 years’ experience in the upstream oil & gas industry. He actively conducts research in Facilities Sand Management, Produced Water Treatment, and Compact Separations Systems - and blogs weekly, teaches courses, and has fifty-six publications on these topics. Hank served as the chair of the SPE Separations Technology Technical Section (2013-2015), was an SME Henry Krumb Lecturer (2011-2012), and co-authored the PEH Chapter on Produced Water Treatment. Dr. Rawlins holds a PhD in Metallurgical Engineering from the University of Missouri-Rolla, is a registered Professional Engineer, and serves as adjunct professor at Montana Tech.

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  • PetroTalk: How to Demonstrate Value and Convince Your Boss to Attend SPE Events

    Contains 1 Component(s) Recorded On: 01/08/2020

    Presented by Mark Anderson, Reservoir Engineer, Canadian Natural Resources

    In an effort to create Web-delivered content that addresses some of the more challenging issues in the oil and gas industry, SPE is considering the implementation of PetroTalks, a platform for SPE to share major presentations from key conferences, applied technology workshops, and summits. Designed to support competency development and knowledge transfer, PetroTalks will capture presentations made by academic thought leaders and subject matter experts addressing current and future industry challenges.

    Presented at the 2019 ATCE.

    Mark Anderson

    Reservoir Engineer, Canadian Natural Resources

  • Exploring the Petroleum Resources Management System (PRMS 2018)

    Contains 15 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This course provides an overview of the 2018 update of the SPE Petroleum Resources Management System (PRMS).

    Description: 

    This course provides an overview of the 2018 update of the SPE Petroleum Resources Management System (PRMS).

    Duration: 7.5 hours

    Expiration: This course expires 12 months from date of registration.

    Content: 

    • Fundamentals of PRMS. This session provides a concise summary of PRMS, and serves as an introduction to later, more detailed sessions.
    • Resources Classifications. This session provides details of criteria for classification of resources as prospective resources, contingent resources, and reserves. In addition, it discusses the subclasses of each resources class, including criteria for promotion to more mature classifications.
    • Details of Resources Categories. This session provides details of categories into which we place resources in a given classification, with an emphasis on the differing degrees of uncertainty in the different categories. We also discuss the various reserves status definitions in PRMS and economic issues that affect placement of resources in the PRMS classification framework.
    • Resources Assessment Methods. This session discusses the elements of deterministic, probabilistic, and geostatistical methods of resources assessment. It also introduces the idea of combining the different methods in an integrated approach.
    • Key Changes in PRMS 2018 Update. This session emphasizes that the PRMS 2018 update is dominated by clarifications rather than revisions. Major changes discussed include modifications of the PRMS classification framework, clarification of the terms “economic” and “commercial,” split conditions and split classifications, treatment of ADR costs, and treatment of “consumed in operations” or CiO.
    • Navigating in the PRMS Document. This session discusses the content of the various sections of the PRMS document and how to locate an item of interest in the document, such as the definition and application of a term or phrase of interest.        

    Dr. John Lee

    Von Gonten Chair in Petroleum Engineering, Texas A&M University

    John holds BS, MS and PhD degrees in chemical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology. He worked for ExxonMobil early in his career and specialized in integrated reservoir studies. He later joined the Petroleum Engineering faculty at Texas A&M, and became Regents Professor of Petroleum Engineering. While at A&M, he also served as a consultant with S.A. Holditch & Associates, where he specialized in reservoir engineering aspects of unconventional gas resources. He joined the University of Houston faculty in September 2011 and held the Cullen Distinguished University Chair until September 2015, when he rejoined the Texas A&M Faculty. He served as an Academic Engineering Fellow with the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) in Washington during 2007-2008, and was a principal architect of the modernized SEC rules for reporting oil and gas reserves. He and his team received the SEC’s Law and Policy Award in 2009. John is the author/co-author of four textbooks published by SPE and has received numerous awards from SPE, including the Lucas Medal, the DeGolyer Distinguished Service Medal and Honorary Membership. He has received Distinguished Achievement and Honorary Life Member Awards from SPEE. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences.

    .75 CEUs and 7.5 PDHs offered.

    Members : USD 200.00

    Non-members : USD 300.00

  • Advances in Sensor Technology Research to Support Drilling Automation

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/10/2019

    The University of Texas at Austin has been working on advanced sensor technologies over the last 6 years in a bid to improve the safety and efficiency of drilling operations, and to reduce uncertainty with regards to data and situational awareness.

    The University of Texas at Austin has been working on advanced sensor technologies over the last 6 years in a bid to improve the safety and efficiency of drilling operations, and to reduce uncertainty with regards to data and situational awareness. The sensor technologies include a cuttings transport sensor, an X-Ray densitometer, an automated rheometer and a bit box sensor. All these sensors are enabled by recent advances in hardware and software technologies. This presentation will introduces all the four technologies, their working principles, the prototypes built and results from field trials. These sensors are expected to play a big role as we move towards drilling automation.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. Pradeepkumar Ashok and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. Pradeepkumar Ashok.

    Dr. Pradeepkumar Ashok

    Senior Research Scientist, Rig Automation and Performance Improvement in Drilling (RAPID) Group, UT Austin

    Dr. Ashok is a PhD in Mechanical Engineering and a Senior Research Scientist in the Rig Automation and Performance Improvement in Drilling (RAPID) Group at UT Austin. He is also the CTO of a startup Intellicess that was spun out of UT to commercialize a technology that allows one to differentiate between sensor and process faults. Previously he was the Program Manager and Chief Scientist of the Robotics Research Group at U.T., where he managed automation projects funded by ONR, NASA, DARPA, John Deere, Union Pacific and Intuitive Surgical. He has authored many publications on sensor data fusion, decision theory, automation and controls. He directs the drilling data analytics student program at UT.

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  • Fracpack Anomalies and Its Impact on Productivity in Deepwater Wells

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/05/2019

    Fracpacking and fracturing are well established techniques carried out for sand control and production enhancement respectively. This talk will focus on typical anomalies that may be encountered during pre-fracture diagnostics and discuss tactical strategies to either delay the pumping treatment to establish a better connectivity or set expectations on treatment and productivity outcomes when these anomalies are noticed via case histories.

    Fracpacking and fracturing are well established techniques carried out for sand control and production enhancement respectively.  Recent work on fracture perforations (perforations in the fracture plane) and off-plane perforations (perforations not aligned with the fracture plane) has highlighted the importance of all perforations in terms of fracture and reservoir connectivity. Depending on the reservoir permeability, perforation shot density and near wellbore fracture alignment with the preferred fracture plane, the production load is always shared between the fracture and perforations and can potentially affect overall productivity.  However, the connectivity aspect is often ignored during pumping operations,that can result in sub-optimal fracture placement.  This talk will focus on typical anomalies that may be encountered during pre-fracture diagnostics and discuss tactical strategies to either delay the pumping treatment to establish a better connectivity or set expectations on treatment and productivity outcomes when these anomalies are noticed via case histories.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Karthik Mahadev and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Karthik Mahadev.

    Karthik Mahadev

    Wells Fracturing and Stimulation Advisor, BP

    Mr. Mahadev is the BP Wells Fracturing and Stimulation Advisor accountable for planning, design and delivery of fracpacks and stimulation treatments across BP, primarily in an offshore/deepwater environment.  Karthik’s expertise are in the areas of Fracturing, Stimulation, Sand Control, Interventions and Formation Damage and has worked the entire gamut of BP Gulf of Mexico’s Deepwater portfolio in these areas.  He also serves as a Cased Hole Fracpack Design Instructor at BP’s Sand Control Advanced Development Program. Prior to joining BP in 2009, Karthik was Pumping Product Line Manager at (CSI Technologies) Superior Energy Services Karthik started his career at Baker Oil Tools in 1998 as a Region Engineer.

    Karthik holds a B.S. in Chemical Engineering, an M.S. in Petroleum Engineering from the University of Oklahoma and an MBA in Finance and Competitive Strategy from the Bauer College of Business, University of Houston.  Karthik serves in the several SPE ATCE Committees and study groups.  Karthik is a member of Beta Gamma Sigma, Honor Society for Business and Pi Epsilon Tau, Honor Society of Petroleum Engineering.

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  • Complete the Machine Learning Life Cycle with Production Deployment

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/05/2019

    The talk will focus on the next crucial steps to operationalize a successful Machine Learning pilot. In order to start capturing business value of a model for competitive advantage, it needs to be effectively deployed into production.

    Machine Learning is one of the biggest value generator in Analytics in the recent years. The data science workflow for machine learning models has started to extend beyond evaluations and there is an increasing demand to set up models at scale in production.

    The talk will focus on the next crucial steps to operationalize a successful Machine Learning pilot. In order to start capturing business value of a model for competitive advantage, it needs to be effectively deployed into production. It is important for every decision-maker to understand how Machine Learning Model production deployment and support work and how to reduce the risk of failure to sustain a Data Science solution.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Tamas Toth and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Tamas Toth.

    Tamas Toth

    Upstream Data Science Supervisor, ExxonMobil

    Mr. Toth is the Upstream Data Science Supervisor for ExxonMobil as a member of ExxonMobil IT (EMIT), Data Science & Analytics organization. In his role he is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the EMIT Upstream Data Science group. As Data Science Supervisor, he organizes and facilitates business critical engagements and leads the Data Science culture change within ExxonMobil. He oversees autonomous teams including employees, contractors, third parties, and contacts in academia in developing and implementing new and emerging solutions. 

    The EMIT global Data Science & Analytics organization, Data Science group is a multidisciplinary team of technical professionals who work closely with research and business units to discover, develop, and apply cutting-edge computing technologies and tools for solving ExxonMobil’s toughest energy challenges. 

    Previously Mr. Toth assumed the Analytics Architect position in ExxonMobil IT Strategy, Architecture & Technology (A&T) organization. In this capacity, he provided strategic application architecture direction and roadmap for implementing analytics solutions at ExxonMobil.

    A&T establishes and manages IT direction, architectures, and IT standards for ExxonMobil and monitors technology trends to determine which technologies are providing enough benefit for an early use. 

    Mr. Toth has been employed with the word wide operations of ExxonMobil Corporation since 2004. In a career spanning 15+ years, he has held technical and managerial positions in IT units covering Data Science, Analytics, Data Warehouse management, supporting UNIX environments and established Process Automation services. 

    Mr. Toth obtained a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology and advanced degree in Business Management.

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  • Causes for Cement Plug Failures and Proactive Measures to Maximize Success

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/21/2019

    It is quite well known within the Industry that cement plug placement and its success in the first attempt is challenging. There are multitude of reasons for failures, such as improper hole cleaning, lack of adequate support for the cement plug, placement techniques, inadequate volume etc. T

    It is quite well known within the Industry that cement plug placement and its success in the first attempt is challenging. There are multitude of reasons for failures, such as improper hole cleaning, lack of adequate support for the cement plug, placement techniques, inadequate volume etc. This presentation will aim at first understanding the main challenges and causes of failures and then provide guidance on best practices to minimize failures and maximize success. It will encompass Fluid selection, placement techniques and use of softwares so that a comprehensive approach can be adopted as recommendations to address these challenges to minimize the risks of failures.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Deepak Khatri and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Deepak Khatri.

    Deepak Khatri

    Product Line Director, Cementing, Baker Hughes

    Mr. Khatri has a total of twenty-two years of industry experience, spread across the Middle East, Europe, Africa and North America. He has worked primarily in oil well cementing and has specialized in the areas of Technical support, design, execution, evaluation of cementing jobs including business and training in relation to cementing. He holds a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Bombay University and a Masters’ in Business Administration from Oklahoma State University. To his credit, he has co-authored SPE papers and has published oil well cementing related articles for trade shows. He has delivered presentations at SPE and other Industry Leading Forums.

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  • CO2 in the Subsurface - From EOR to Storage

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/19/2019

    Presented by Dr. Gary Teletzke

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the International Energy Agency (IEA) have issued recent reports suggesting that deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) can significantly reduce the cost of achieving CO2 emission reduction targets.  However, several questions remain: Under what circumstances will large-scale deployment take place? Where and when will this occur? How large a role will CCS play in stabilizing atmospheric concentrations of CO2? I will review the current status of CO2-EOR and geologic storage focusing on subsurface lessons learned and their implications for large-scale CCS.

    Our industry has a long history with CO2-EOR that provides a strong experience base for CO2 storage. However, CO2-EOR alone will be insufficient to meet emission reduction targets and storage in deep saline aquifers is also being investigated.Experience from operating CCS projects shows that subsurface storage capacity in saline formations can be limited by dynamic injectability factors. Hundreds of years of CO2 storage capacity is potentially available, even after accounting for dynamic limitations, but the areal distribution of potential storage capacity is widely varied. Geologic and reservoir engineering studies will be essential for identifying storage sites having adequate capacity, containment, and injectivity. Petroleum engineers will play a key role in these studies.

    All content contained within this webinar is copyrighted by Dr. Gary Teletzke and its use and/or reproduction outside the portal requires express permission from Dr. Gary Teletzke.

    Dr. Gary Teletzke

    Senior Technical Advisor, Enhanced Oil Recovery, ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company

    Dr. Teletzke has led research projects related to gas injection EOR, chemical EOR, and compositional reservoir simulation. He has also led several EOR field studies, integrating laboratory work, reservoir simulation, and pilot testing. For the past ten years, he has provided technical leadership to research efforts on CO2 sequestration. He has published more than 40 technical papers and patents. He has organized numerous SPE conferences over the past two decades and served as Executive Editor of SPEREE from 2015-2017. He was named an SPE Distinguished Member in 2013. He received a BS in chemical engineering from Northwestern University and PhD in chemical engineering from University of Minnesota.

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